Repair the World Launches “Act Now for Racial Justice” Campaign

Offering opportunities to stand against racial injustice through service, Repair the World today launched Act Now for Racial Justice, a campaign that coincides with the Jewish High Holidays and that will continue through MLK Day and Passover in 2017. The campaign includes resources for young adults to learn how racism permeates economic, social, and criminal justice systems; to host meals and discussions with peers exploring how our food systems perpetuate racial injustice; and to take action and serve with communities to move closer to racial justice.

“Like in the Black community, young adults are leading our Jewish community in creating change; and, by standing in solidarity, they are making a meaningful difference, sending an important signal, and building deep relationships across racial lines,” said David Eisner, CEO of Repair that World. “Our Jewish values compel us to stand for racial justice and to right the wrongs we see nearly daily; this feels especially urgent right now, as we look to understand where we’ve fallen short over the past year, and to mark the New Year by resolving to do better. Act Now for Racial Justice offers our community tools to take action through service in a Jewish context, and to address important inequities in our communities.”

The meals hosted during the campaign will be part of Repair the World’s Turn The Tables initiative, and will include educational materials, including discussion guides. A portion of the meals are supported by OneTable.

Learn more at werepair.org/high-holidays, including information on service opportunities around the country to counteract racial injustices in food and educational equity. Follow #ActNowForRacialJustice on Twitter for stories and interviews with Jews of color and others standing against racial injustice Act Now for Racial Justice will continue to offer service and reflection opportunities year-round, including on MLK Day and Passover 2017.

To stand as allies with victims of racial injustice, Repair will send a Jewish delegation to Facing Race, November 10-12 in Atlanta, GA. Facing Race is a collaborative endeavor to grow the racial justice movement and the largest multiracial, intergenerational gathering for organizers, educators, creatives and other leaders.

“Meaningful service in solidarity with communities of color is a powerful way to take a stand against racial injustice,” Eisner adds. “We are all part of America’s racial justice journey and young adults often look for activeroles they can play to positively impact this journey. Frankly, each of us already play a role in the racial justice journey of our community and our country.  The question we each need to ask is whether we are satisfied today with what that role has been.”

Join Character Day on September 22

On September 22, thousands of synagogues, schools, and communities around the world will screen free films as part of Character Day – an annual celebration of films and media focused on the science of character development from different perspectives. The day was born a few years ago when a team of award-winning filmmakers asked the question, “What would it look like to have people around the globe devote one day to talking about character?”

One of the Character Day films, The Making of a Mensch, explores the building of character from a Jewish perspective. And this year, experts from around the world – including the former Chief Rabbi of England, Jonathan Sacks, will join in the experience by sharing his perspectives during a global, live-casted Q&A session.

Character Day participants will also have access to educational resources about Jewish ethics, discussion materials, and an online hub for connecting with other communities on the day itself, and throughout the year.

Find out more about Character Day below, and sign up to screen one of the free, short films in your community!

Watch 1min Character Day Trailer from The Moxie Institute on Vimeo.

On Cooking and Combatting Hunger with Michael Solomonv

Michael Solomonov is coming to Shabbat dinner in Pittsburgh.

On August 26th, the James Beard Award-winning chef of Modern-Israeli restaurants Zahav and Dizengoff (among other renowned eateries), will join Repair the World for an intimate dinner and conversation about cooking and combatting hunger.

Solomonov, who has supported numerous anti-hunger initiatives during his tenure as a chef, will be joined by a cross-section of nonprofit service partners, neighbors, lay leaders, and Repair the World Fellows, along with members of the local community. (Ahem, that could mean you! See below for details.)

The event is part of Pittsburgh’s Three Day Blow, an innovative festival that brings together food writers and food makers for a celebration of regional food and literature. Pittsburgh is one of Repair the World’s flagship cities, and the Shabbat dinner will highlight both the connections we make around the table, and the importance of working towards a just food system – within the city, and beyond.

The meal will be prepared by local Pittsburgh chef, Bill Fuller, who’s vegetarian menu will include late-summer inspired dishes like heirloom tomato salad with grilled corn, creamy polenta with a spicy marinara, and peach cobbler with blueberry ice cream. (Yum!) And the meal is open to the public! Email Sam Permutt ([email protected]) for more information and to reserve your seat at the table.

Life After a Repair the World Fellowship: Ariel Wexler

Last month, the current class of Repair the World Fellows held their final closing circles and said so long – but not goodbye! We’ve been incredibly inspired by their work as change makers during their fellowship year, and are excited to keep up with them in the months and years to come.

Here’s Ariel Wexler who was one of Repair the World’s Food Justice Fellows in Pittsburgh. She took some time to share the impact she was able to have on others over the course of the year, and the impact the fellowship had on her. Read on, then find out more about becoming a Repair the World Fellow.

What drew you to being a part of the Fellowship?
At UC Santa Cruz where I went to college, I became extremely passionate about environmentalism. My main focus was on the complexities of the food system and practices of sustainable agriculture. Growing up in a strong Jewish community and being fascinated with the history of the Jewish people I decided to minor in Jewish Studies. I thought that the Repair the World fellowship would be the perfect combination of both my interests in food justice and the Jewish community.
Read more