What We Stand For at Repair the World

This post originally appeared in The Forward on January 19, 2017

By Liz Fisher, COO Repair the World

I haven’t (yet) seen Hamilton. Like many, I’ve heard the soundtrack and recently was reminded of a lyric from the show: “If you stand for nothing, Burr, what will you fall for?” “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.” Turns out, that quote likely didn’t originate with Alexander Hamilton. Whomever said it first, it echoes in my head as we move towards inauguration day and a new administration.

At Repair the World, we recognize that dissent and debate leshem shamayim (for the sake of heaven) are inherently Jewish and American values. We honor the rights of individuals and organizations to disagree, to express their opinions and perspectives in non-violent ways, and to engage in action to improve our communities and nation.

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Baking for Social Change in Philadelphia

This post originally appeared on The Schusterman Blog on January 19, 2017

By Zoe Braunstein

Zoe Braunstein is doing a year of service as a Food Justice Fellow in Philadelphia with Repair the World. In her partnership with Challah for Hunger, she leads challah bakes and educational programming around issues of hunger and food access with the Social Change Bakery pilot project.

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Communal Orgs Gearing Up For Obamacare Fight

This post originally appeared in The New York Jewish Week on January 18, 2017

By Amy Sara Clark

As the Republican-controlled Congress gears up to repeal the Affordable Care Act, and the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office releases an estimate that doing so could cost 32 million people their health insurance, local Jewish groups are scrambling to figure out how to blunt the effects of an impending implosion of Obamacare.

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Federation Partnering With Repair the World to Expand Jewish Young Adult Volunteerism in Miami

This post originally appeared on The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Website on January 17, 2017

Repair the World is coming to Miami! Federation is partnering with this nationally renowned organization to encourage peer-to-peer engagement among young Jewish adults in Miami’s Midtown/Downtown/Brickell area. After opening successful programs in Detroit, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Repair the World will work closely with Federation’s Jewish Volunteer Center (JVC) and The Network, Federation’s Under-40 Division, to expand its social impact through volunteer recruitment and programming in the Jewish and general communities. Repair the World Miami is set to launch this summer.

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MLK Day: We need to act now for racial justice

This post originally appeared in The Times of Israel on January 14, 2017

By David Eisner, President & CEO, Repair the World

I thought it would feel good to be in a new year. Like many, I was ready for 2016 to end, to put this toxic election behind us and, along with it, the ugliness in public and private discourse, unmistakable efforts by both parties to win by depressing turnout for the other, and the anger, outrage and kind of violence I’d naively thought was behind us as a nation.

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MLK Day: We Need to Act Now for Racial Justice

This post originally appeared on The Times of Israel on January 14, 2017

By David Eisner

I thought it would feel good to be in a new year. Like many, I was ready for 2016 to end, to put this toxic election behind us and, along with it, the ugliness in public and private discourse, unmistakable efforts by both parties to win by depressing turnout for the other, and the anger, outrage and kind of violence I’d naively thought was behind us as a nation.

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Campaign Promotes Racial Justice Activism for Young Jews Over Martin Luther King Day Weekend

This post originally appeared in Haaretz on January 11, 2017

By Staff

The year-long “Act Now for Racial Justice,” a program of the Repair the World initiative, plans to engage thousands of Jewish young adults in supporting racial justice through volunteer service, dialogue and learning over the MLK holiday weekend.

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