Crowdsourced Summer Reading List!

Ahhh, summer. There’s no better time to head to your favorite bookstore or download a bunch of virtual tomes to Kindle and get reading!

Each summer, Repair the World puts out a hot weather reading list of our fave social change titles. This year, we’ve done the same, suggesting classic and hot-off-the-presses reads that are sure to inspire. But we also want to hear from YOU! Help us create the best-ever crowdsourced summer reading list by letting us know what world-changing books you’re bringing with you to the beach. Share your recs in the comments below or by tweeting @repairtheworld #SummerReading.

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS
Maya Angelou
Beloved feminist poet and writer, Maya Angelou, passed away this year. Celebrate her life and work by reading (or rereading!) her classic 1969 autobiography, which explores subjects including racism, identity, and being a woman.

THE THIRD PLATE: FIELD NOTES FROM THE FUTURE OF FOOD
Dan Barber
One of America’s most respected chefs and food activists shares his thoughts on how the local food movement has failed to achieve its goals – and how it can do better. Barber’s food writing is as lively and passionate as it is informative, and this just-released book is among his best.

A FIGHTING CHANCE
Elizabeth Warren
Read the newly-released autobiography of the Massachusetts senator – from her childhood in small-town Oklahoma to her current status as one of the country’s most passionate, rabble-rousing defenders of the middle class.

THE END OF POVERTY
Jeffrey Sachs
Delve into some thrilling (really!) money talk, as economist Jeffery D. Sachs shares his knowledge and vision for creating a “safer, more prosperous future” for the world.

I AM MALALA
Malala Yousafzai
If you haven’t already, now is the time to pick up a copy of the courageous young Pakistani woman and human rights activist who refused to be silenced in her fight for education.

So, what are YOU reading this summer? Tweet us at @repairtheworld #SummerReading.

Repair Inspiration: Eden Village Camp Makes the New York Times

Here at Repair the World, we have been big fans of Eden Village Camp – the Jewish organic farm camp – since the get go. We have profiled their awesome summer program, with its environmentally-focused, hands-on, empowering approach to summer camp education. We even volunteered to help them build their greenhouse!

So we were very psyched to see Putnam Valley, New York-based program profiled recently in the New York Times for its innovative and gutsy “no body talk” policy, which aims to shift kids’ and preteens’ awareness from a body image and style-driven focus to deeper engagement with one another. Check out the excerpt, and read the full piece at The New York Times’ website:

No Body Talk at Summer Camps
New York Times, July 18, 2014

“Last August, on a clear summer day, Tom and Maura Gould were driving their 12-year-old daughter from Eden Village, an organic farming camp in Putnam Valley, N.Y., to their home in Cambridge, Mass., when they started talking about family members who were particularly hairy.

“Why would you want to talk about that?” their daughter, Aviva, asked from the back seat. “There are much better things to talk about than someone’s looks.”

For many people, including children, talking about physical attributes would be no big deal. But for Aviva, this kind of talk sounded an alarm, mostly because she had not heard it at camp.

At Eden Village, staff members and campers follow something called the “no body talk” rule. “The specific rule is while at camp, we take a break from mentioning physical appearance, including clothing,” said Vivian Stadlin, who founded the camp six years ago with her husband, Yoni Stadlin. “And it’s about myself or others, be it negative, neutral or even positive.”

On Friday afternoon, when the campers, girls and boys from 8 to 17, are dressed in white and especially polished for the Sabbath, they refrain from complimenting one another’s appearances. Rather, they say, “Your soul shines” or “I feel so happy to be around you” or “Your smile lights up the world,” Ms. Stadlin said.

Signs posted on the mirrors in the bathroom read, “Don’t check your appearance, check your soul.”

more…

Repair Inspiration: Kicking To-Go Coffee Cups to the Curb

We all know the pattern. Wake up, head to a café on the way to school or work. Order a coffee, tea, latte, or grande whatever with extra whip – to go. Drink coffee, toss out cup. Repeat.

Well, an inspiring article on Co.Exist suggests there could – and should! – be a better and less wasteful way to get our caffeine fix. Of course, there are reusable mugs we can tote along, but lots of coffee shops get sketched out about using them. (Health codes can be strict!) But what if, just like a bike rental or a library, we could borrow them for the day? Check out the excerpt below, and read the whole article on Co.Exist’s site.

“Earlier this week, a team of social good entrepreneurs launched a cup-sharing pilot program in DUMBO, a cute and highly expensive cobblestone neighborhood in Brooklyn. The DO School, a 10-week international social good program, partnered with the Brooklyn Roasting Company to roll out 500 ceramic cup-share mugs. Instead of buying a disposable cup each day, coffee-drinkers have been picking up their bright blue mugs from the Brooklyn Roasting Company and returning used ones to be washed and sanitized the following day.

“The regular single-use cup costs about 15 cents, which is quite a significant number,” says DO School CEO Katherin Kirschenmann. ‘Even that location in DUMBO, they go through a thousand cups a day. Think about a midtown Starbucks. Cutting down those costs is actually a pretty big incentive.’ It’s a big incentive for New Yorkers, too. Bring in a cup-share mug, and it’s 25 cents off the price of coffee. For a city of shameless caffeine addicts, that’s not a bad deal.”

Read more…