Repair the World Announces Cindy Greenberg as New President and CEO

Greenberg Served As Interim CEO Since March 2019,
Founded Repair the World NYC in 2014

New York – October 18, 2019 – Repair the World today announced Cindy Greenberg as the organization’s next President and CEO. Greenberg, who has served as Repair the World’s Interim President and CEO since March of 2019, is also the founder of Repair the World New York City. Repair the World will be celebrating this appointment at its Tenth Anniversary Celebration on Wednesday, October 23, in Harlem.

“Cindy has devoted her life to advancing the role of meaningful service in the American Jewish community and building genuine partnerships within communities nationwide. Her years of dedication and commitment to this cause make her the perfect leader for Repair the World,” said Larry Brooks, Board Chair of Repair the World. “I have worked closely with Cindy during my time as Board Chair and have been consistently impressed by her commitment to Repair, her passion for our mission and her dynamic leadership during a period of significant growth and transition for our organization. We are extremely fortunate to have such a uniquely qualified individual to lead Repair into the future.”

“I am deeply grateful for this opportunity to continue leading an organization so close to my heart, with an incredible staff devoted to the cause of service rooted in Jewish values,” said Greenberg. “During my time at Repair, we have engaged thousands of young adults in service opportunities to help drive social change in their communities. As we celebrate our 10th anniversary, I am excited to work with our staff, program leaders and volunteers across the country to build on the progress we have made together and secure a strong future for service in American Jewish life.”

Prior to assuming the role of Repair’s Interim President and CEO in March, Greenberg served as the founding executive director of Repair the World NYC, where she built a robust program focused on mobilizing the Jewish community to meet pressing local needs through service and learning in Central Brooklyn and Harlem. In four years, Repair the World NYC engaged more than 30,000 New Yorkers, mostly young adults, in meaningful service and learning with more than a dozen community partners focused on education equity, hunger and housing justice. Before joining Repair, Greenberg worked for Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life for fifteen years, including as the executive director of NYU’s Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life. She is the recipient of several honors including the Schusterman Fellowship, the Shirley Chisholm Women of Excellence Award and the Harvest Heroes Award.

Greenberg’s selection is the culmination of a robust national search process by the Repair the World Board of Directors in partnership with an outside hiring firm.

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ABOUT REPAIR THE WORLD:
Established in 2009, Repair the World is a national nonprofit organization that mobilizes young adults to address pressing local issues through service, based in Jewish values, heritage and learning. Headquartered in New York City, we connect individuals with meaningful service opportunities in nine communities across the U.S., and train national partners to run effective programs rooted in Jewish values. For more information, visit weRepair.org.

A Fellow’s Reflections from Pittsburgh–One Year Later

By Abigail Natelson
Repair the World Atlanta Fellow 2019-20

This October, some things feel the same, and some different.  Many of us observe Yom Kippur as we have done since childhood.  Many of us honor the change of seasons and the harvest from within temporary outdoor dwellings or Sukkot.  This October, Repair the World reaches a milestone as a national organization and will celebrate 10 years of focusing our Jewish community on best practices in volunteer service.  Amidst all of these occasions, one stands out as painfully unlike the others: the first anniversary of the White Nationalist terror attack on Tree of Life Synagogue. One of our Atlanta Repair Fellows, Abigail Natelson, grew up in Pittsburgh and shares her recollection of the event with us below:

Almost a year ago, I penciled a note into my calendar under Saturday, October 27th: “Halloween party with friends, dressing up as characters from Shrek, Pitt plays Duke.” Pittsburgh was ready for this regular weekend of rest, fun, and for many, Shabbat.

On the morning of the 27th, I woke up before my alarm to a calm fall day, with time to relax and appreciate the quiet morning. After a few deep breaths, I was jolted from my state of serenity by the blaring sound of what I learned later to be nearly every vehicle in Pittsburgh’s emergency fleet racing down the boulevard perpendicular to my street. Not too unusual for the city, but it seems off. Minutes later, I received an alert from the University: “Shots fired at the Tree of Life Synagogue on Wilkins Ave. Police operations are ongoing. Avoid the Squirrel Hill/Shadyside area.” Tree of Life Or L’Simcha? Where we celebrated my camper’s Bat Mitzvah last weekend? Is there more than one Tree of Life in Pittsburgh? I knew there was not. 

Then the notifications on my phone arrived, and for weeks they did not relent. The phrase “active shooter” appeared. Is this not everyone’s worst nightmare? Along with the slew of Groupme and Facebook messages was a text from my mom in the suburbs of Pittsburgh: “Rabbi ended services early. Headed home.” Call mom. When she picked up, I asked why someone would shoot at the synagogue, and it was her who convinced me that he had entered the sacred space with a weapon and was targeting actual human beings. “6 people are dead.” Dead. I hadn’t seen this word yet. Right down the street. Our community is being killed. Before I had even understood the situation, people were already dead. I was crying as I felt my community collapse. 

For hours, I sat with friends and roommates, refreshing the news stories over and over. The next few days were an indistinguishable fog of vigils, abundant communal support, and realizations about the danger all targeted minorities face in the US.  Today, our fear of the possibility of weapons harming our community and our neighbors has not subsided. Given that, I wish to amplify an article by Ilana Kaufman that initiates a discussion on how to keep synagogues safe for our multi-racial Jewish community, acknowledging the challenges of traditional security measures.  Continuing this dialogue is critical. 

As the weekend of October 27th approaches, it brings both the season of Halloween costumes and a time of heightened anxiety for the Jewish community. I am hopeful that, amidst the haunting and traumatizing memory of that Shabbat, the Jewish community, especially my insurmountable Tree of Life and Pittsburgh family, will experience some measure of peace and joy from the community’s outpouring of radical love and support.

9/11 Memorials And Events In New York City

This originally appeared on the Patch on September 9, 2019.

By Sydney Pereira

Wednesday marks eighteen years since the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center site in 2001. Across the city, commemoration events will honor the 2,983 people who were killed in the attacks at the WTC site, the Pentagon, and aboard Flight 93, as well as those who were killed in the 1993 bombing at the World Trade Center next week.

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Smarter Justice | Opinion

This originally appeared on the Pittsburgh Current on September 3, 2019.

By Jessica Semler

Last week, the Pennsylvania Sentencing Commission hosted hearings in Harrisburg, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh to hear from the public about a Risk Assessment Instrument. The state legislature mandated the commission to come up with an algorithm to assess a defendant’s risk for violence in 2010. They’ve gone back to the drawing board a handful of times after receiving scrutiny from various groups about the very nature of using a mathematical equations and data that could affect someone’s life.

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Reflections on JPRO19: What Connects Us

This originally appeared on The Jewish News on August 24, 2019.

By Robin Axelrod

JPRO Network, an organization that connects, educates, inspires and empowers professionals working in the Jewish community sector, sponsored an oversold conference, “JPRO19: What Connects Us,” at Cobo Arena Aug. 12-14.

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The true power of volunteer service | Opinion

This originally appeared on The South Florida Sun-Sentinel on August 26, 2019.

By Janu Mendel

One of my most formative memories from childhood growing up in Jamaica has to do with Labor Day. Not because of beaches and barbecues, but because back home, it is a holiday that takes the word “labor” quite literally — it’s a national day of service. All over the island people dedicate the day to volunteer projects that uplift the neighboring communities.

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A Montgomery experience

This article was originally published in The Times of Israel on August 11, 2019. 

By Zack Block

It’s been three months since I returned home to Pittsburgh after a trip to Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with my Repair the World colleagues. It has taken me just as long to put my experience and observations into words.

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East End Brewing continues YOU ARE HERE series with Troy Hill and East Liberty beers

This article originally appeared in Pittsburgh City Paper on August 6, 2019.

By Amanda Waltz

Pittsburgh fans of sours and cream ales will welcome the two latest additions to End End Brewing Company’s YOU ARE HERE series.

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Troy Hill, East Liberty latest in East End Brewing’s neighborhood beer collection

This article originally appeared on the Trib Live on August 2, 2019.

By Joanne Klimovich Harrop

Next up on East End Brewing’s neighborhood beer list: Troy Hill and East Liberty. The neighborhoods were chosen by Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and are part of the “YOU ARE HERE” beer series by East End Brewing Co. and announced via Instagram.

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Repair the World Fellows to receive tuition discount at Chatham

This article originally appeared on the Pittsburgh Jewish Chronicle on July 24, 2019.

By Toby Tabachnick

Repair the World, a national volunteer service organization with a Pittsburgh chapter, has entered into a strategic partnership with Chatham University to support alumni of the Repair the World Fellowship. Chatham will offer an automatic 20 percent tuition discount to alumni of the Repair the World Fellowship admitted into many of its graduate studies programs.

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