array(1) { [0]=> int(22) }

Brooklyn Celebrates MLK Day in a Year Like No Other

This article originally appeared in the Bklyner on January 15th, 2021. 

The Brooklyn Children’s Museum (BCM) in Crown Heights will host service workshops led by Repair the World Brooklyn, a jewish organization that works within the community of Central Brooklyn through volunteer groups to make it a “more equitable place” for all, according to their website.  With Repair the World Brooklyn, people can learn about volunteer opportunities and pack PPE for people in need. Through a Facebook post, the BCM will also teach volunteers about social justice in their work with community service. Children will be able to learn freedom songs with singer imani uzuri, explore shadow puppets with Nehprii Amenii, and create community art in the museum’s ColorLab art studio.

Read More

MLK Day Service Projects: How To Help In Atlanta

This article originally appeared in Patch News on January 15th, 2021. 

Repair the World — an organization that gathers volunteers to support local neighborhoods through partnerships with community-based organizations — is launching more than 600 coronavirus-safe volunteer opportunities for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, both in-person and virtually. There are seven Atlanta-area projects being offered for the holiday, ranging from delivering meals and clothing to planting trees.

Read More

Things to do this weekend from poetry unplugged to sweet honey in the rock

This article originally appeared in Next Pittsburgh on January 15th, 2021. 

Repair the World Pittsburgh MLK Day projects  were featured in  “Things to do this weekend” in NEXTpittsburgh. “There are so many ways to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by lending a helping hand in our local community. Volunteer in person or virtually during this four-day, citywide effort. Find an opportunity that’s right for you!”

Read More

Drive-Thru Food Distribution Event Thursday Morning in Miami-Dade County

This video originally appeared on 6 South Florida on January 14th, 2021.

A drive-thru food distribution event is being held Thursday morning amid economic hardship brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. The drive-thru site at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation opened at 9 a.m. In addition to packages containing non-perishable food products, bread, and locally grown fruits and vegetables, kosher meat will also be available to residents. “While the drive-thru is open to all in need, it is a unique opportunity for members of the Jewish community who follow strict kosher dietary laws,” a press release said.

Watch Here

Virtual service opportunity: How you can stay safe this MLK Weekend

This article originally appeared in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on January 12th, 2021.

“Despite our fears and uncertainty, we must continue to care for each other — especially as racism, inequity, poverty, and needless suffering persist,” Repair the World Atlanta‘s executive director Lily Brent said in a statement. “Repair is committed to our work in education and meaningful service together with our partners — and hope the community will join us to make sense of this moment in service and in learning.” 

Read More

 

Jewish Racial Justice Learn-In

An opportunity for dialogue on race, racism and social change.

Given the intention to honor Dr. King, and the racial justice reckoning we are living through, Repair will gather Jewish learners and leaders for a virtual Learn-In. The Learn-In will offer a diverse set of programs with many voices, entry points, and perspectives to deepen our learning about the themes of Dr. King’s life and legacy and move us forward together as a community.

 

Microgrant: Programming for and by Georgia Jews of Color
February 5, 9:00am – 5:00pm ET

Atlanta Repair and a local committee of Jews of Color have created a microgrant to support Georgia Jews of Color creating programming–either for their own communities, however defined, or for the larger public. This microgrant is powered by the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta, through a Propel Innovation Grant for Jewish service and learning in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Individuals and/or organizations can apply for funding. For more information, click the link to the right. DEADLINE FEBRUARY 5. APPLY TODAY!

Jewish Racial Justice Literacy 101
January 13, 7:30pm – 8:45 pm ET

We are in the midst of a national conversation about racial justice. Some of us have been talking about this topic for years while others are unsure how to begin. Facilitated by Victoria Raggs, Trinae Watkins and Lily Brent, this event will explore key concepts on race and racism through the lived experiences of Atlanta’s diverse Jewish community. Our facilitators will lead an examination of microaggressions that take place every day in our Jewish institutions and hold space for Jews to engage in a dialogue about race. This event will scratch the surface of a very deep issue, while encouraging people of all experience levels to think about how we join collectively in the movement for equity and inclusion. REGISTER TODAY!

Jewish Racial Justice Literacy 102
January 17, 4:00pm – 5:15 pm ET

As a follow-up to Jewish Racial Justice Literacy 101, this event will explore ways to personally address microaggressions and guide participants on how to move from intention to action. Facilitated by Jada Garrett, John Eaves and Pam Sugarman, this event will provide tools for having open and honest conversations. Attendees will participate in a reflective practice on race and racial justice and leave with clear steps they can action on their learning journey. REGISTER TODAY!

Becoming Better Allies
January 18, 7:30pm – 8:45pm ET

Where have you experienced solidarity this year and when has community let you down? This discussion, moderated by Ruby-Beth Buitekant of Movement Law Lab, will feature healthcare advocate Abbie Fuksman, former Executive Director of the Tahirih Justice Center Shana Tabak, and Georgia Equality Gender Inclusion Organizer Chanel Haley. We will host a conversation on what is a “Jewish issue” at a time of growing diversity within the Jewish community, and draw upon both Jewish wisdom and Dr. King’s teachings to guide us in becoming better allies both to members of the Jewish community and to our neighbors. REGISTER TODAY!

MLK Family Singalong & Story-Time with Tkiya
January 18, 9:00am – 9:45am ET

Looking to teach your young ones about MLK’s legacy this year? Join Repair the World Atlanta, Tkiya, and 18Doors on Monday, January 18th from 9-9:45am for a virtual fun and interactive introduction to Martin Luther King Jr. Day for children ages 0-7 and their families. Through songs, stories and learning, we’ll be introducing topics of race, diversity and equity. REGISTER TODAY!

 

 

OUR PARTNERS

  

 

OUR PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Leslie Anderson, Jonathan Arogeti, Cecelia Borgman, Breauna Dorelus, Dr. John Eaves, Robin Deutsch Edwards, Jada Garrett, Rabbi Samuel Kaye, Nicole Moore, Amy Price, Victoria Raggs, Rabbi Francine Roston, Howie Slomka, Pam Sugarman, Trinae Watkins, William Whatley

Even With New Relief Package, Georgia Could See Higher Levels Of Hunger For Years

This article originally appeared in WABE on December 23, 2020.

A recurring scene this year around the country has been lines. Cars snake through parking lots turned into COVID-19 testing sites. Shoppers wait outside stores with limited capacity. Families line up for help getting food on the table. Earlier this month, there was one of those lines at a shopping center on Buford Highway. “There’s always a line,” said Marco Palma, president of the non-profit organization Los Vecinos de Buford Highway. It’s one of the groups behind the food distribution event. “If we say we’re starting at 10, people start lining up at like 8:30 or 9.”

Read More

Community Agreements

Growing up with a strong commitment to both my Judaism and my desire to help others, I knew that after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh in 2019 I wanted to serve with Repair the World. Before I began the Fellowship, I thought I had a good understanding of what it meant to serve my community and encourage others to do the same. I was wrong! There was more to learn about interacting with my community, especially while serving and engaging volunteers and community members. 

I have been serving with Repair the World Pittsburgh since August 2019 as an education justice Fellow, where I first was on a team with four other Fellows and served alongside nonprofit service partners. Now, in my second year as a Fellow, I am coordinating and facilitating our PeerCorps program, which provides meaningful service opportunities for Jewish teens. Repair works to mobilize Jews and their communities to take action to pursue a just world, igniting a lifelong commitment to service. 

At Repair, we have complex conversations and we are constantly learning by pushing ourselves outside of our comfort zones to address the world’s injustices so we can better serve our communities. In order to have productive and respectful conversations around challenging topics, Repair has developed a best practice of Community Agreements. This practice involves thinking of and agreeing to a list of guidelines that all participants abide by during a conversation, enabling room for all people, thoughts, ideas and mistakes. 

What I slowly learned through these conversations and, by extension, Community Agreements, isthat while the practice aids in productive conversations, even more so it supports how we show up in our service work. 

I want to share five community agreement principles that have helped me not only in my work at Repair but also have enhanced the relationships I hold with my family, my friends, and the community at large. 

  1. Speak from an “I” place. Speak YOUR truth and YOUR experiences. When engaging in conversation with anyone, it is important that you don’t speak for anyone else. Show up with your own point of view. We know ourselves better than anyone else and it is important that we respect each other enough to not put words in their mouth.
  2. Make space, take space. If you have not shared your thoughts and experiences, move up, and participate in the conversation. If you have been speaking up a lot in conversation, take on the role of the active listener. In society, White people have dominated the conversation for hundreds of years. As a White person I had to understand that we have controlled the room, the conversation, the narrative, and have benefited from racist institutions. It is imperative now that we step back from the conversation and listen.
  3. Own your impact. While you may have not intended harm, you may have caused harm that impacted someone else. Even if you had the best of intentions, it doesn’t matter if you can’t take personal accountability for how your actions impacted someone else.
  4. Lean into discomfort. In life, we need to try new things, have difficult conversations, and admit mistakes in order to learn. It is hard to move forward in life if we do not try anything new or challenge ourselves. Ask for help, practice, and pivot when something is not working. It won’t always be easy, but the results are worth working for.
  5. Finally, attend to your needs. Take care of yourself first, before you can do the work to care for the people around you, your community. This will help you show up with the greatest resilience and deepest truth. This is not selfish and it doesn’t mean that you don’t care about others or want to help others. If you burn yourself out and do not take time to rejuvenate you can not effectively help others to the best of your ability. 

There are many more community agreements that are useful and important. To me, these five are the starting point. As you practice incorporating these into your life, remember one thing. Practice, practice, practice. (I guess that was really three things)! No one is perfect and conversations will not always go smoothly. But, if you try to integrate these community agreements into your daily interactions, I truly believe that the practice will only strengthen your relationships with your family, friends, and your community. 

Alyssa Berman is a Senior Fellow, coordinating and facilitating Repair the World Pittsburgh’s teen programing. She is passionate about building Jewish Community and you can usually find her on Zoom attending programs from the Young AdultDivision at the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh or attending Repair events in other cities!

Serving The Moment at Shemesh Farms

This article originally appeared in The Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles blog on December 18, 2020.

When the pandemic first started, the Jewish community — from coast to coast — responded with Serve The Moment (STM)* to give opportunities to young adults who are eager to help make an impact while staying true to Jewish values such as tikkun olam (healing the world) and rachmanut (compassion). Our Federation’s second Serve the Moment L.A. cohort concluded on December 11th. Our 18 passionate young Jewish Angeleno corps members were matched with a variety of nonprofit organizations in L.A., spending a month volunteering, either virtually or in person, and undergoing personal and professional growth.

Read More

Seize the Moment

This article originally appeared in Jewish Federation and Endowment Fund blog on December 18, 2020.

Serve the Moment is a program launched by Repair the World that mobilizes Jewish young adults to engage in critical racial justice work, tackle food insecurity, strengthen our education system, combat social isolation, and address the economic fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic.

As a Service Corps member, I had the opportunity to volunteer with Youth Spirit Artworks (YSA), a nonprofit organization based in Oakland. YSA is responding to the homeless crisis by building a “Tiny House Village” to provide shelter, community, and job training for homeless youth. My city coordinator and the team at YSA employed my interest in nutrition and passion for service to curate a plant-based cookbook for the village community to provide healthy recipes for communal dinners.

Read More