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Sharing Repair the World’s adaptive strategic plan

This article originally appeared in eJewishPhilanthropy on April 6th 2022

The pandemic shed light on the interconnectivity between our health, safety and the ability for our communities to thrive. Meanwhile, young Jews are reinterpreting what it means to be Jewish in America with more wanting to connect with organizations that align with their values. Three out of four say leading an ethical life and 59% say working for justice and equality are essential to being Jewish.

In summer 2021, Repair the World received $7 million from MacKenzie Scott and Dan Jewett to expand our efforts to mobilize Jews and their communities. This gift highlighted the increasingly powerful role that service will play in building bridging across lines of difference, meeting needs exacerbated by COVID, fostering empathy for one another, and furthering social change in the years to come. These funds will allow us to build vibrant Jewish life to an unprecedented scale, engaging tens of thousands of young adults in service and Jewish learning annually.

Read the full article here

Solon native spends spring break doing public service

This article originally appeared in Cleveland Jewish News on March 29th 2022

Solon native Ben Truong and other Ohio University students gathered in New York City in early March to participate in an alternative spring break service opportunity with Repair the World, a national volunteer organization focused on Jewish values.

“We accomplished so much but what I really learned was to appreciate everything that I have and to really think about how to improve my community little by little,” Truong said. “Change doesn’t have to be huge. The small moments of helping others add up to make a big difference.”

Read the full article here

Repair the World Mobilizes Communities to Join the #ServiceMovement This #WorldWaterDay

This article originally appeared in San Diego Jewish World on March 21st 2022

Repair the World, an organization that mobilizes Jews and their communities to take action to pursue a just world, igniting a lifelong commitment to service, today encouraged either in-person or virtual volunteering to support meeting vital community needs this World Water Day.

Celebrated on March 22, #WorldWaterDay is an annual United Nations Observance that celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2 billion people living without access to safe water.

Throughout the month of  March, we encourage everyone to volunteer in person or virtually and learn with us about pressing needs around water access and conservation,” said Eli Greenstein Jacober (he/him) Director of Campaigns.  “As we serve and learn to sustainably manage this precious resource, we center our value of kavod ha’briyot, the preciousness of each human, to understand the impact that water has on us as individuals and our communities. We need to take action as climate change diminishes access to safe and clean water globally.”

Read the full article here 

Repair the World mobilizes communities to join the #ServiceMovement this #WorldWaterDay

This article originally appeared in Jewish News Syndicate on March 21st 2022

Celebrated on March 22, #WorldWaterDay is an annual United Nations Observance that celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2 billion people living without access to safe water.

Throughout the month of  March, we encourage everyone to volunteer in person or virtually and learn with us about pressing needs around water access and conservation,” said Eli Greenstein Jacober (he/him) Director of Campaigns.  “As we serve and learn to sustainably manage this precious resource, we center our value of kavod ha’briyot, the preciousness of each human, to understand the impact that water has on us as individuals and our communities. We need to take action as climate change diminishes access to safe and clean water globally.”

Read the full article here

Repair the World Mobilizes Communities to Join the #ServiceMovement this #WorldWaterDay.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 22, 2022

Contact:  Jason Edelstein

510/239-1102

Repair the World Mobilizes Communities to Join the #ServiceMovement this #WorldWaterDay.
World Water Day Efforts Include Local and Virtual Service Projects, a Special Podcast Series and Other Learning Resources 

(New York) – Repair the World, an organization that mobilizes Jews and their communities to take action to pursue a just world, igniting a lifelong commitment to service, today encouraged either in-person or virtual volunteering to support meeting vital community needs this World Water Day.

Celebrated on March 22, #WorldWaterDay is an annual United Nations Observance that celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2 billion people living without access to safe water.  

Throughout the month of  March, we encourage everyone to volunteer in person or virtually and learn with us about pressing needs around water access and conservation,” said Eli Greenstein Jacober (he/him) Director of Campaigns.  “As we serve and learn to sustainably manage this precious resource, we center our value of kavod ha’briyot, the preciousness of each human, to understand the impact that water has on us as individuals and our communities. We need to take action as climate change diminishes access to safe and clean water globally.”  

Repair the World also launched a #WorldWaterDay podcast series, hosted by Ella Fies (she/her), Repair the World Miami Fellowship alumni, with special guests including Rabbi Ed Rosenthal (he/him) founder of Tikkun HaYam, Javier de Leon (he/him) Lead Program Consultant at LavaMaeˣ, Julie Tsivia (she/her) a Grade 2 Wastewater Plant Operator at East Bay Municipal Utility District  and Eric Rosenblum (he/him) and environmental engineer specializing in water resource management and reuse.  

“We encourage you to tune in to Repair’s #WorldWaterDay podcast series, guided by our value of achdoot, solidarity, to learn about how you can support their efforts and provide necessary supplies and direct-service across the country,” continued Eli.  “Our inspiring guests share personal stories and perspectives on water access and action. We hope their stories inspire people to serve and live out our value of action and learning na’aseh v’nishma, meeting the pressing needs around water access in our communities.” 

LavaMaeˣ, one of Repair’s key partners for #WorldWaterDay, provides free resources, including mobile showers, a Pop-Up Care Village, and handwashing stations, through a lens of Radical Hospitality, to people experiencing houselessness. 

 

For more information on volunteering with Repair or the podcast, please visit werepair.org.  

 

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Repair launches Economic Access Fund to remove economic barriers for Repair the World service corps members, fellows and staff impacted by injustice

This article originally appeared in Jewish News Syndicate on March 17th 2022

Repair launches Economic Access to remove economic barriers for Repair the World service corps members, fellows, and staff impacted by injustice. The fund covers immediate economic needs, such as transportation, mental health support, required technology, appropriate clothing, and other unexpected costs, and can provide additional personal and professional support, such as professional development and mentorship.

Read the full article here

Seven lessons from a $7 million Scott-Jewett gift

This article originally appeared in Philanthropy News Digest on March 14th, 2022

Kate O’Bannon (she/her), Chief Strategy Officer, and Cindy Greenberg (she/her), President and CEO of Repair the World, share the implications of a multi-million-dollar unrestricted gift and lessons learned about how best to leverage and maximize the impact of that funding.

“This gift will strengthen our team and dramatically accelerate how we grow meaningful service and Jewish learning opportunities for young adults—from efforts to advance education justice and racial justice, meet the needs of community members alongside service partners at soup kitchens and urban farms, and much more. We’re proudly working toward one million acts of service and learning by 2026.”

Read the full article here!

Couples Social Justice Shabbat Brunch

This article originally appeared in JewishBoston on March 8th 202(Photo: Rachel Park/Unsplash)

Come gather with Modern JewISH Couples and Repair the World Boston for Shabbat afternoon brunch (yes, bagels at 2 p.m.!) and social justice learning. We can’t wait to see you!

Vaccinations and registration required.

Led by Rabbi Jen Gubitz and Katie Hamelburg, Repair the World Boston program manager.

Generously supported by Combined Jewish Philanthropies and the Covenant Foundation.

See the full article here

 

You Should Know … Lou Fusco

Lou Fusco
Lou Fusco (Courtesy of Lou Fusco)

This article originally appeared in Baltimore Jewish Times on March 4th 2022

Lou Fusco (they/them), 23, strives to advocate for social justice through their work at Repair the World Baltimore. Fusco graduated from Goucher College in 2021 with a degree in sociology and anthropology, and with a concentration in social justice. They also double minored in dance and women, gender, sexuality studies. After graduating, Fusco became a Repair the World fellow.

Lou Fusco currently lives in Charles Village.

How did your involvement with Hillel at Goucher College enhance your college experience?

I was involved with Goucher Hillel for three years. I started off as an engagement intern in my sophomore year, then went on to plan programming in my junior year and culminated my time as co- president during my senior. My time with Goucher Hillel enhanced my collegiate experience in multiple ways. The most notable being that some of my closest friends were made through Hillel. We would all hang out together, doing homework in the Hillel lounge. We also watched movies together after Shabbat dinner. Even though some of us have graduated and we’re spread out across a couple different states, we’re still in contact and talk to each other often.

Besides being able to make friends and feel connected to the Jewish community on campus, Goucher Hillel also provided me with space and time to find my Jewish identity. It’s still something that I am honing in on now, but Goucher Hillel was one of the first places I was able to discover how I wanted to celebrate and practice Judaism. It provided a safe space for me to question what I was taught before, deconstruct preconceived notions and rebuild myself as the Jew I wanted to be.

What does it mean to be a Repair the World fellow?

Being a Repair the World fellow means a lot of things. It means volunteering at local organizations, serving the community, sharing skills, entering the professional world, building relationships, inspiring others … I could go on. But, most of all, I think being a Repair the World fellow is all about learning. Through both local and national sessions, we learn about many different important issue areas like food justice, education justice and housing justice. It also means learning how to be an anti-racist and an active ally. At the heart of it all though is learning what social justice really looks like and how we can enact it on an individual, communal, national and eventually global level. It’s about understanding the long-standing connection of social justice to Judaism and then putting it into tangible and equitable action. Our organization is named after the Jewish value of tikkun olam — repairing the world. So, I believe that the fellowship, at its root, is about harnessing the power we all have towards fixing what has been broken.

How did you become involved with this work?

I see my work as a Repair the World fellow as a continuation of the work I was doing on Goucher College’s campus, both through Hillel and with my majors and minors as a whole. I actually found out about the fellowship through some of my connections at Goucher Hillel. I was a senior who was job hunting and my Hillel co-president, a junior at the time, shared with me the job listings posted by Repair the World. Unfortunately, I was not quite qualified for any of them. But a couple days later Goucher Hillel posted about the Repair the World fellowship on Instagram and how it was a great opportunity post-undergrad. It just felt right. One thing led to another, and a couple interviews later I was offered a position as a fellow with Repair the World Baltimore.

Why is social justice important to you?

Social justice is important to me simply because of the identities I hold. I am a queer, nonbinary, genderfluid Jew. I believe my mere existence is an act of resistance to the heteronormative, patriarchal, capitalist systems I was born into. At the same time, I have racial and class privilege that cannot be ignored. So, I also see how I need to use my positions of power to fight for the social justice of others who don’t have the same as me but should. I have always had a passion for social justice. It’s been ingrained in me from a young age. To me, asking why social justice is important is like asking why food or water is important. Because it’s needed.

Do you see yourself continuing in this field in the future?

I definitely see myself continuing to work in the social justice sphere. I know that I want to be an activist and an advocate. Whether that will be through a Jewish organization or not is still to be determined. Everyone tells me that I should go to law school. But right now, I’m focused on the fellowship and will see where it takes me.

Volunteer Immersively: Join the Service Corps

This article originally appeared in JewishBoston on February 25th 2022

Check out the story of Jasmin Bach, a two-time Service Corps member who volunteered at The Neighborhood Developers (TND) in Chelsea. Jasmin explained that when she joined the service corps, “… it became clear to me that tikkun olam, repairing the world, was a vital part of being Jewish. Serving is now part of both my personal and Jewish values. Caring for others is why service is so important to me now.” She further explained the impact of her time at TND, writing that “it’s amazing to see a group of nonprofits from all over Boston come together and share resources that will not only uplift the organizations but allow for greater access to food for members of the Boston community.”

Apply to the Service Corps today!