Archive for : Baltimore

Finding a balance: Service, advocacy, and the role of religion

The following post originally appeared on Medium as a blog post for the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies.

By Josh Sherman

In today’s world, I find it increasingly difficult to separate distinct parts of my life and put them in nicely partitioned boxes. At times, aspects of my life bleed into one another in a harmonious symphony and at times they seem to run up against one another and clash ferociously. Oftentimes I debate as to whether this is somewhat of a new phenomenon for the millennial generation or a reflection of the political times that we find ourselves in. I find comfort in believing that this is not a new struggle, and that for hundreds of years humans have searched to find their personal balance.

Read More

A Jewish journey from indifference to inspiration

The following post originally appeared on Medium as a blog piece for the Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies.

By Diana Goldsmith

When I was eighteen, right before I headed off to my freshman year of college, I announced to my parents that once I graduated, I planned to join the Peace Corps. I wanted to travel, to see parts of the world I had never seen before, and above all (my naive teenaged self thought), I wanted to help people.

Read More

Community members clean up Baltimore area

This article originally appeared in the Johns Hopkins Newsletter on September 20, 2018.

By Jason Nyguyen 

Repair the World: Baltimore hosted its annual Day to Unite at the Baltimore Community ToolBank on Sept. 16. Community members worked together on various environmental projects.

According to their website, Repair the World inspires American Jews to give time and effort to serve those in need, aiming to make service a defining part of American-Jewish life.

Read More

Tisha B’Av Through a Modern Lens

This article originally appeared in the Baltimore Jewish Times on July 20, 2018.

By Connor Graham

On July 15, the same Sunday morning as the World Cup Finals, a passionate and outspoken group of more than a dozen young Jewish adults gathered at the Moishe House in Canton for a program called “Brunch & Learn Tisha B’Av: Turning Tragedy into Action.” Tisha B’Av is the most mournful day on the Jewish calendar, commemorating the destruction of the temples in Jerusalem.

Read More

Diana G. | Repair the World

This article originally appeared on Charm City Spotlight on May 22, 2018.

What brought you to Baltimore?
I grew up in Baltimore County. In 2016, I began working in the city, and I moved to Remington in the summer of 2017. I have loved every minute of it! I love spending time by the harbor, going to the numerous parks, and checking out new restaurants or hole-in-the-wall bars.

Read More

Repair Inteview: Ruben Chandrasekar on Helping Refugees in Baltimore

This interview is being shared as part of #SupportforRefugees, Repair the World’s Passover campaign focusing on the global refugee crisis.

Imagine leaving everything and everyone you know, and starting life over from scratch. For the millions of refugees around the world who are forced to flee war and persecution in their home countries, this unimaginable situation becomes everyday reality.

As someone who immigrated to the United States as a teenager, Ruben Chandrasekar personally understands the challenges that come with being uprooted. And his experiences drive his work as Executive Director of the Baltimore chapter of International Rescue Committee (IRC), an organization that helps refugees rebuild their lives. Repair the World recently spoke with Chandrasekar about IRC’s refugee resettlement work in Baltimore, how volunteers can get involved, and his thoughts on how the Jewish community can make a difference in the lives of today’s refugees. (Spoiler alert: it involves Albert Einstetin.)

How did you get involved with refugee work?
I was born in Chennai, India and moved to the US with my mom when I was 14. I lived in a small town in Upstate New York, and was the first non-white kid in the school. I faced a lot of challenges and discrimination as a student. My mom, who was a prominent nurse in India, couldn’t find work as a nurse until she passed the board exam. She studied for the boards while working as a home health aide. I remember driving her to someone’s home to take care of them once. An elderly gentleman opened the door, took a look at her, and said, “We don’t want your kind in our house.”
Read more