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Archive for : Detroit

Reflecting On Service In BIPOC Majority Communities

When Megan stepped into the role of fellow at Repair the World Detroit in 2020, she was quickly impassioned to engage the BIPOC community in Detroit by creating spaces to connect and build community, through the power of service. “I wanted to reimagine how we engage with our BIPOC communities more meaningfully,” Megan said. 

Megan and Repair the World Detroit fellows began creating stories around volunteering that was being led by Black owned service partners and highlighting them on social media. Rather than just disseminating information, the fellows created dialogues by asking the community questions surrounding service and its connection to Detroit and its history. “Something that was important to us was to not only uplift the work we were doing but to create spaces for the community to express what service meant to them.” Megan used this passed MLK Day and Black History Month as a springboard for how she envisioned engaging with Detrioters in impactful service while uplifting Detroit’s history and the voices of BIPOC’s. 

“We are not in partnership with as many BIPOC led partner organizations as we’d like to be,” said Megan. Repair the World Detroit used this as an opportunity to uplift Black led organizations in Detroit that were serving their communities and creating space to build partnerships. “This was a way for us to use our resources and our audience to elevate these organizations doing amazing work,” Megan said.

The fellows also found ways to tap into Detroit’s rich Black history by highlighting Black led organizations that not only served their communities in the past, like Dunbar Hospital – the first Black hospital in Detroit, but Black led organizations that continue to serve their communities today, like Detroit Heals Detroit – an organization combating trauma amongst young Black people while dismantling oppressive systems for marginalized Detroit youth and a service partner of Repair the World Detroit. “Black history isn’t just a thing of the past but something currently being made today,” Megan said. Sarah Allyn, Executive Director of Repair the World Detroit says, “We honor the past by uplifting the present and investing in the future. Part of doing that is by uplifting these voices.”

Megan’s goal for the remainder of her fellowship is to continue working towards strengthening the connection between Repair the World and the communities being served. Megan said, “We’re really thinking about this moment as us planting the seeds for building strong relationships with the communities we serve in the coming years and bridging the gaps, allowing us to make a more meaningful impact.”

Megan is currently a social media fellow at Repair the World Detroit where she is expanding her skills in effectively progressing the betterment of marginalized communities as well as learning more about Judaism and the history of solidarity between the Jewish and Black community. She was a part of the multifaith internship cohort with the Truitt Center for Religious & Spiritual Life at her university. There she envisioned, planned, and executed educational and cultural events such as Diwali, Eid, and Holi that effectively reached more than 150+ students collectively. She has a passion for learning about different religious/worldviews and promoting civil dialogue on various topics. 

The Well & JN’s 36 Under 36: Ellery Rosenzweig

This article originally appeared in The Detroit Jewish News on February 1st, 2021.

Ellery is currently working at Repair the World Detroit as their youth & family engagement associate running PeerCorps Detroit, their teen service-learning program, and supervising Repair fellows in their year of service at Detroit nonprofit organizations.

During the pandemic, she has created an online series for PeerCorps exploring social justice issue areas within the context of COVID-19.

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U.S. Immigration Policy Sparks Action in Michigan

This originally appeared in The Jewish News on January 16, 2020. 

Sarah Allyn, executive director of Repair the World Detroit, a Jewish organization that encourages volunteer service, explains how Repair tries to help people who directly experience the effects of anti-immigrant policies. “At Repair the World, we work closely with communities experiencing the immediate and terrifying impact of our current climate,” she says. “While there are many ways to take action as a Jewish community, Repair believes meaningful service, combined with learning and self-reflection, promotes action and change. “By serving alongside impacted communities, we listen, learn and build relationships to truly understand what people need and how we might best support them.”

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Kendra Watkins and Ben Ratner Return to Detroit

This originally appeared on The Jewish News on December 5, 2019.

Kendra Watkins and Ben Ratner return to Detroit as Repair the World Fellows working with Detroit Jews for Justice and the Coleman A. Young Elementary School.

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Vigils scheduled to show solidarity with Pittsburgh

This article originally appeared in The Detroit News on October 28, 2018.

Vigils are planned locally to help “process the horrific act of violence” that left 11 dead at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.

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Jewish Detroit Community Vigil For Pittsburgh

This article originally in The Jewish News appeared on October 28, 2018.

Tomorrow at 6 p.m., Hazon Detroit, The Well, Repair The World: Detroit, Detroit City Moishe House, Detroit Jews for Justice, the Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue, NEXTGen Detroit, the JCRC/AJC Detroit and the Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detroit will host a vigil for the fallen victims of the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh.

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Vigils held for Pittsburgh synagogue shooting victims

This article originally appeared on Fox Detroit on October 29, 2018.

By WJFK

People around the world are praying for the victims of the tragic Pittsburgh synagogue shooting and their families.

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Leading By Example

This article originally appeared in The Detroit Jewish News on August 2, 2018.

By Robin Schwartz

Repair the World’s new executive director reflects on her inaugural year.

You might find her jogging through Detroit’s Woodbridge neighborhood or working in a greenhouse or helping to bury old prayer books in a sacred space for Jewish texts. But you’ll most likely find Sarah Allyn, 30, of Detroit at Repair the World’s cool headquarters on Bagley, where she just wrapped her first year as executive director of the Jewish nonprofit focused on service-learning and volunteering.

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No More Waste

This article originally appeared in the Detroit Jewish News on April 19, 2018.

Hazon Detroit serves up healthy heaps of compost — just in time for Earth Day.

In the North End neighborhood of Detroit near historic Oakland Avenue, there is a large patch of land where houses used to stand, houses where Jewish immigrants first began their American journey, that in time became the homes for some of Detroit’s most important black cultural figures, including Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin and so many more.

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De La Salle’s Ross shines in the face of adversity

This article originally appeared in The Macomb Daily on February 5, 2018.

By Don Gardner

Some of us buckle in the face of adversity. Others thrive in spite of it. Adam Ross, a senior at De La Salle Collegiate High School in Warren, would fall in the later category.

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