Archive for : Heroes

Repair Hero: Betty Friedan

March is National Women’s History Month – and in 2010, the month’s celebratory theme is: writing women back into history. On that note, I can think of no better person to honor as this week’s Repair the World hero than Betty Friedan (1921-2006), whose writing forever shaped the feminist movement, and the country’s very understanding and estimation of women:

When Betty Friedan (nee Bettye Goldstein) graduated from Smith College in 1942, women’s rights and opportunities in America were severely restricted. Despite a stunning academic record and a degree in psychology, she spent many years suppressing her professional ambitions to live out the suburban homemaker’s life, so typical of post-WWII society. But Friedan would ultimately grow beyond her limited surroundings.
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Repair Hero: Adam Jacobs

Adam Jacobs is in the business of empowering kids.

He is the Executive Director and co-founder, along with his brother Stephen, of Kids Creative – an arts non-profit that engages students from pre-K through high school in writing and performing their own live theatre and musical events. The programs, which run after school and at camps during the summer, empower participants to create something they’re proud of, and help build leadership and communication skills.

The organization’s vision of “a better, more peaceful future…through the arts,” is focused around what the Jacobs brothers call the 6 C’s of peacemaking in youth: confidence, creativity, conflict resolution, community, collaboration and – of course – cookies. Kids Creative has worked with more than 2,000 students in NYC to create over 85 original productions and countless songs – like this one about dancing robots.
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Repair Hero: Eli Winkelman

Who says a college student can’t change the world? When Eli Winkelman was an undergrad at Scripps College in California, she started a program called Challah for Hunger. The idea started out small: bake fresh, delicious challah every week and sell it to students and faculty to raise money for hunger and disaster relief.

The program was a hit (even former President Clinton took notice) and began to spread to other colleges. As of 2009, Challah for Hunger had chapters on 30 campuses across the country and had raised more than $130,000, with half of the proceeds going to American Jewish World Service’s Sudan Relief and Advocacy Fund, and half going to local, national, or international organizations chosen by campus organizers.
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