Archive for : New York City

Classic American paintings transformed to reflect gun violence

This story originally appeared on News 12 Brooklyn on February 5, 2018. 

By Amanda Bossard

CROWN HEIGHTS – Fourteen classic works of American art have been transformed by Brooklyn artists to reflect gun violence in modern day society. The exhibits named “Guns Don’t Kill –a re-imagining” is on display at the Repair the World NYC offices in Crown Heights.

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Volunteers Turn Out To Fight Hunger For Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

This radio segment originally appeared on CBS New York on January 14, 2018.

By Kelly Waldron

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — With Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day coming up on Monday, many volunteers hit the streets this weekend to honor the civil rights leader. As WCBS 880’s Kelly Waldron reported Sunday, 2,500 volunteers have been working across the city this weekend to take part in Hunger Free America’s MLK Serve-a-Thon.

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Volunteers help promote food program in Crown Heights

This article originally appeared on News12 Brooklyn and BK Reader on January 14, 2018.

By Torri Singer

BROOKLYN – Thirty volunteers took to the streets of Crown Heights Sunday to promote SNAP, the benefits and food program that provides assistance for nearly 1.8 million low-income New Yorkers. Volunteers from Prepare the World say getting active and giving back is a way to honor Martin Luther King Jr., and to improve the neighborhoods they live and work in.

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Norman Glockwell? See What Happens When Guns Are Thrust Into Iconic Artwork

This post originally appeared in Bedford and Bowery on January 12, 2018.

By Dabuek Maurer

You’ve seen what happens when Hollywood guns are replaced by thumbs ups or, even better, selfie sticks. Now see what happens when guns are swapped in to famous works of art.

An exhibit coming to Brooklyn will feature artwork where pistols, rifles, and other weapons and violent imagery are inserted into interpretations of works by Norman Rockwell, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer… even Dr. Seuss.

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Bed-Stuy Urban Farm Fills Gap in Fresh Foods

This article originally appeared in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on November 28, 2017,

By Andy Katz

What better way to express faith in nature’s ultimate benevolence than scheduling an outdoor fundraiser in late November? After weeks of unseasonably chill temps and enough rain to dampen the Pacific Northwest, the Tuesday before Thanksgiving presented almost 20 degrees warmer and hardly a cloud in the sky. It’s just what Dr. Melony Samuels, founder and CEO of Bed-Stuy Campaign Against Hunger (BSCAH), needed for her annual Harvest Heroes fundraiser.

This year’s Heroes included Cindy Greenberg, executive director of Repair the World, a national organization that enables American Jews, in the spirit of Tikkun Olam, to volunteer in communities where their efforts can have the greatest impact. Repair the World NYC has been involved with BSCAH for the past four years. “What Melony was doing went right to the heart of Repair’s mission,” Greenberg said. “Supporting [BSCAH] was an easy choice.”

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Why I am Inspired to Act Now

This post originally appeared in e-Jewish Philanthropy on November 22, 2017.

By Raffaella Glasser

After over two months as a Repair the World Fellow it still feels like yesterday that I sat at Capital Camps at the Repair the World national orientation surrounded by my fellow fellows. We each were embarking on our year of service with Repair the World. I was in awe of the people I was meeting – each fellow coming from across the country with an incredible set of skills, amazing experiences and drive for the work they were about to begin. I couldn’t help but wonder how I would fit into Repair. Would my skills and experiences prepare me for the year to come?

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Artist Spotlight: Kehinde Wiley

In the month leading up to MLK Day, our blog will be exploring diverse expressions of art created by people of color. The blog will highlight artists, collaborators, performers, poets, filmmakers, and everything in between. We will be exploring creative outlets that express the various ways racial injustice exists today.

In addition to reading, you can join our MLK Campaign and help us serve in solidarity by hosting and volunteering. Together we can #ActNowForRacialJustice.

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A Racial Justice Shabbat Dinner with Michael Twitty

Shabbat dinner naturally has a lot going for it. The food (challah! matzo ball soup!), the singing, the camaraderie, the chance to truly rest and enjoy friends and family after a long week – it’s hard to improve upon. But one recent Shabbat dinner held in Atlanta, Georgia last week stands out from the pack.

On November 11, Repair the World hosted a #TurntheTables Shabbat dinner as part of our time at Facing Race: A National Conference – a multiracial, intergenerational gathering focused on racial and social justice. We had spent time at the conference engaging with and learning from community organizers, educators, interfaith clergy members, and other leaders of the racial and social justice movements, and it was time to rest and recharge.

Michael Twitty As night fell and the Shabbat candles were lit, more than 100 people joined together around the table (or rather, many tables!) for dinner, discussion, and a conversation with culinary historian and writer, Michael Twitty.

Twitty focuses much of his scholarship on the history and culture behind African and African-diaspora cuisines, as well as on the idea of “identity cooking” – his theory about the way people construct and express their complex identities through food. As a Black Jewish man, Twitty often writes about his own experiences melding the, as he writes on his website, “histories, tastes, flavors, and Diasporic wisdom of being Black and Jewish.”

With the results of the national Presidential election just 3 days old, he spoke about the commonalities and distinctions between the Jewish and Black experience as minorities in America, and the critical importance of loving and protecting one another as full and complex human beings.

During dinner, guests were also prompted to discuss questions around the table like, “Where are you coming from in your racial justice journey?” which gave them a chance to get to know one another on a deeper level. The dinner closed with an alternative take of the Birkat Hamazon – or the grace/thanks traditionally said after meals in the Jewish tradition. The words of the blessing said it all:

“Giving and receiving we open up our hands / from seedtime to harvest we’re partners with the land.
We all share a vision of wholeness and release / Where every child is nourished and we all live in peace.”

For more information about Repair the World’s #TurntheTables Shabbat dinner, check out the article in the Atlanta Jewish Times, read through the dinner guide Repair the World created, and listen to Twitty’s speech in full.