Archive for : Opportunities

Your Guide to Pride

June is LGBT Pride Month, – a month that remembers the Stonewall Riots of 1969, while honoring the impact that LGBT community has had – and are having – around the world!

Repair the World wishes to honor this special month by offering some exciting ways you can get involved to advocate for a life of equality. We’re also highlighting some amazing LGBTQ heroes who are working to end hate across the world.

Inspiring People from the LGBTQ Community

Fagyele Ben MiriamFaygele Ben Miriam, Same-Sex Marriage’s Jewish Pioneer
Tablet Magazine profiles the incredible activist career of Faygele ben Miriam – a man who started Washington state’s battle over marriage more than 40 years ago. Written by Pulitzer Prizer winner Eli Sanders. This is a MUST read. Read more »

Brittany McMillanBrittany McMillan, Founder of #SpiritDay
At just 15, Brittany ignited a national movement in support of LGBTQ youth when she started Spirit Day. What began in 2010 as a Tumblr page devoted to the memory of LGBTQ or LGBTQ-perceived teens who lost their lives to suicide, turned into a global event that inspires millions of people to wear purple each year in a stand against bullying. Learn more »

Noam ParnessNoam Parness, LGBTQ community organizer, activist, volunteer & all-around rock star
Noam Parness is a 22-year old rising senior at Queens College (and all around inspiring guy), who organizes for the LGBTQ community – both on campus and off. Noam took some time out of his schedule to talk about speaking on National Coming Out Day, the importance of building coalitions within a movement, and how Jewish tradition fuels his work. Learn more »

Upcoming LGBTQ events and opportunities

BornsteinKate Bornstein at Beit Simchat Torah Congregation
On June 22, meet the inspiring Kate Bornstein, Jewish transgender activist, theorist, playwright & performer. Her book, “Hello, Cruel World: 101 Alternatives to Suicide for Teens, Freaks and Other Outlaws” is an underground best seller, propelling Kate into an international position of advocacy for marginalized youth. She’s been honored by the NYC Council, received Keshet’s Hachamat Lev award, and garnered praise from civil rights groups around the globe. Learn more »

LGBTQ Teen ShabbatonCelebrate being yourself! Jewish LGBTQ Teen Shabbaton
This August, join Jewish LGBTQ and allied teens for a weekend of fun, social activities and supportive learning sessions at the Isabella Freedman. Presented in partnership with Keshet and UJA-Federation of New York. Learn more »

Camp PrideCAMP PRIDE Summer Leadership Camp
Let’s go camp! Now you can develop friendships for a lifetime with other LGBTQ and ally college students, build your leadership skills and take action as a social justice advocate for a safer and more inclusive campus. Learn more »

Ways to Get Involved

GLSENStart a GSA at your school!
Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are student clubs that work to improve school climate for all students, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. Did you know that the first GSA was the idea of a straight student? Find out how to start your own GSA or join an existing network. Learn more »

Trevor ProjectVolunteer with The Trevor Project!
Every day, The Trevor Project saves young lives through its free and confidential lifeline, in-school workshops, educational materials, online resources and advocacy. Trevor recognizes that volunteers are the backbone of the organization, and offers ways to get involved at all ages. Are you interested in volunteering? Learn more »

Human Rights CampaignVolunteer with Human Rights Campaign!
Volunteering with HRC empowers you to be an important part in creating change for our country. Work with HRC to educate the public about critical issues in the LGBTQ community, mobilize your community to take action, expand the voice and visibility of the LGBTQ community, and bolster a a nationwide effort to end hate and discrimation. Learn more »

Pledge to Speak out against intolerance!

It Gets Better ProjectIt Gets Better Project
Everyone deserves to be respected for who they are, and growing up isn’t easy. The It Gets Better Project was created to show young LGBTQ people the leavels of happiness, potential and positivity their lives will reach – if they can just get through their teen years.. Pledge to speak up against hate and intolerance. Learn more »

The Bully ProjectThe Bully Project
A year ago, BBYO teens launched Stand UP for Each Other: A Campaign for Respect and Inclusion, a grassroots effort focused on creating safe and welcome communities for all Jewish teens. Show your support for the Stand UP Campaign by helping BBYO and The Bully Project raise awareness around this very serious issue and put an end to bullying. Learn more »

Do Not Stand Idly ByDo Not Stand Idly By, a Jewish Community Pledge to Save Lives
Do Not Stand Idly By asks the Jewish community to pledge to end homophobic bullying and harrassment of any kind in our synagogues, schools, organizations, and communities. As a signatory, you are supporting an fully inclusive Jewish community, and pledging to speak out when witnessing intolerance. Learn more »

More resources

Check out these additional resources on how to help make this world a more inclusive society for all.

So, how will you make this world a better place? Let us know @repairtheworld.

 

Trash Your Trash: Spread the Word About Recycling

Breakfast yogurt. Gum wrapper. Takeout lunch. Glossy magazine. Shopping bag. Plastic water bottle. Each of these daily items may seem small and insignificant, but bundled together they add up to a whole lot of trash. Four pounds to be exact – the average amount that each person throws away (and that ends up clogging up landfills) every single day!

Thankfully, our friends over at DoSomething.org have teamed up with Nestlé Waters to, well, do something about America’s trash problem. Their goal: to spread the word about the importance of recycling and double the country’s recycling rates by 2018.

The initiative, called Don’t Be Trashy, invites participants to check out some recycling statistics, share them with friends via Facebook and Twitter, and select a sustainability project idea or two (everything from recycling 25 items to talking to a school principal about getting recycling bins) to begin making an on-the-ground difference. To sweeten the deal (as if a cleaner environment weren’t gift enough!) they’re giving away great prizes like free movie tickets and $500 college scholarships to lucky participants.

The Jewish tradition, believe it or not, is also on board with recycling and sustainability. The mitzvah of bal taschit (do not destroy) serves as a reminder of our ongoing responsibility to keep the natural world clean and healthy by avoiding waste. Wanna learn more? Check out the hilariously informative video on bal taschit below (featuring a cartoon version of Al Gore!). Then, help DoSomething.org spread the word about recycling – and trash your trash!

Let us know how you’re getting the word out about recycling – leave a comment below tweet us at @repairtheworld.

Monday Link Roundup

Happy Monday everyone! We hope you had a wonderful (maybe even snowy?) weekend. To get your week started off on the right foot, here’s Repair the World’s weekly roundup of inspiring service-related posts from around the web.

  • The Jew & The Carrot posted an essay about the importance of the upcoming Farm Bill and how (and why!) Jews should get involved with this important piece of legislation.
  • The Huffington Post published a story by famous techie Bill Gates, which features young people’s words and ideas about how to change the world. Have a world-changing idea of your own? Read on to find out how you can share it with Bill!
  • The Huffington Post, on the subject of young people changing the world, also published an article about Sandbox – a network of innovative leaders, all under 30, who are shaping the world for the better.
  • AJWS (one of Repair the World’s grantee-partners) recently released a must-watch video in support of their Where Do You Give? campaign. It might just make you think about tzedakah in a whole new way.
  • GOOD shared the story of the guerrilla gardener, a very cool guy in London who plants gardens in neglected corners across the city.

Make a Fashion Statement: Donate Your Clothes

Let’s face it: fashion is everywhere. Last week was the Golden Globes…which means that now, we’re all checking out the best and worst-dressed of them all. And sure, it’s totally fun to get some new winter gear–pick out some great new kicks, hot new trends, find a good sale, or make a bold fashion statement. But we also know that some people aren’t worrying about being chic or making a statement. Thousands of people hardly have enough to keep themselves clothed at all – especially during the colder winter months.

This season, instead of focusing on what’s new, what’s chic, and what “must-haves” to buy, why not focus on what we think the hottest trend is this year: giving back.  Yes, Jewish texts remind us to “share bread with the hungry,” and “clothe the naked.” In other words, we should help provide comfort with those who are less fortunate. But it also just feels kind of good.

So why not start a new trend and get a get a jump on your spring cleaning? Take a look through your closet for those “gently used” items to donate, or launch a clothing drive at your school, synagogue or in your community. You will be all the rage.

A few great organizations that accept clothing donations, and use the proceeds to help those in need:

  • Teens for Jeans: ( FYI, we learned from DoSomething that one in three homeless people in the U.S. is under the age of 18). To help  out, DoSomething.org has teamed up with Aéropostale to run their annual Teens for Jeans donation program . Start a donation program at your school to help others and potentially win some cool prizes.
  • Housing Works: This NYC-based organization takes donations of clothes, shoes, accessories and more and sells them at their 12 thrift shops across the city. The money raised helps to fund their work around HIV/AIDS advocacy and services.
  • Brown Elephant: The proceeds of donated items purchased in this Chicago-based network of thrift shops help fund under-insured or uninsured patients at a local health clinic.

Pretty amazing stuff.

We’re no  experts, but we think sometimes the boldest  statement you can make has absolutely nothing to do with what you’re wearing.

Know of another great clothing donation opportunity? Let us know about it below, or on twitter at @repairtheworld.

Work for Social and Environmental Justice with Tevel b’Tzedek

Israelis have a thing for Nepal. Each year, thousands of young Israelis strap on their backpacks and travel the world, with many ending up in Kathmandu. It’s no surprise then, that the state’s capital city regularly hosts one of the world’s largest annual seders, often feeding more than 1,500 travelers. (That is a LOT a lot of matzah!)

Now, Repair the World grantee-partner Tevel b’Tzedek (The Earth- In Justice) offers another way to have a meaningful Jewish experience in Nepal. This February, Israelis and Jews from around the world can join Tevel b’Tzedek on a 4-month adventure promoting environmental justice and human rights and working to ease poverty in Nepal.

The Israel-based nonprofit launched in 2007 with the mission to “create a community of Israeli and Diaspora Jews engaging in the urgent issues of global poverty, marginalization and environmental devastation from a place of deep commitment to the Jewish people and its ethical and spiritual traditions.” Since then, more than 250 people have participated in the volunteer fellowship in Nepal and Haiti (where they also run service programs.)

The Nepal program combines both Jewish study and volunteering including:

  • Working with local communities on youth education, agriculture, women’s empowerment, and health
  • Learning about social and environmental justice, Judaism, economics, globalization and the history and culture of Nepal.
  • Studying Nepali language.
  • Volunteering both in Kathmandu and outside in more rural areas.

Check out the Tevel b’Tzedek experience in participants’ own words by watching the video below and checking out their personal blogs. Then, apply for the 4-month program here.