Archive for : Press

A Montgomery experience

This article was originally published in The Times of Israel on August 11, 2019. 

By Zack Block

It’s been three months since I returned home to Pittsburgh after a trip to Montgomery and Selma, Alabama with my Repair the World colleagues. It has taken me just as long to put my experience and observations into words.

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East End Brewing continues YOU ARE HERE series with Troy Hill and East Liberty beers

This article originally appeared in Pittsburgh City Paper on August 6, 2019.

By Amanda Waltz

Pittsburgh fans of sours and cream ales will welcome the two latest additions to End End Brewing Company’s YOU ARE HERE series.

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Troy Hill, East Liberty latest in East End Brewing’s neighborhood beer collection

This article originally appeared on the Trib Live on August 2, 2019.

By Joanne Klimovich Harrop

Next up on East End Brewing’s neighborhood beer list: Troy Hill and East Liberty. The neighborhoods were chosen by Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto and are part of the “YOU ARE HERE” beer series by East End Brewing Co. and announced via Instagram.

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Repair the World Fellows to receive tuition discount at Chatham

This article originally appeared on the Pittsburgh Jewish Chronicle on July 24, 2019.

By Toby Tabachnick

Repair the World, a national volunteer service organization with a Pittsburgh chapter, has entered into a strategic partnership with Chatham University to support alumni of the Repair the World Fellowship. Chatham will offer an automatic 20 percent tuition discount to alumni of the Repair the World Fellowship admitted into many of its graduate studies programs.

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40 Under 40: Lily Brent

This article originally appeared in The Atlanta Jewish Times on July 17, 2019.

A graduate of Oberlin College, Lily Brent began her career advocating for changes in criminal justice policy and practice with the nonprofit Family Justice. In 2010, she joined the JDC’s Jewish Service Corps and spent a year volunteering at the Agahozo-Shalom Youth Village in Rwanda.

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Service As An Act Of Prayer

This article originally appeared in The New York Jewish Week on July 9, 2019

By Jeremy Nicholson, 2018-19 Repair the World Harlem Fellow

Every Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m., the quaint and quiet basement of All Souls’ Episcopal Church on St. Nicholas Avenue in Harlem comes alive. Knives are put to use, pots boil, ovens warm in the background as friends and acquaintances, old and new, chatter. In the next five hours, a meal for up to 100 people will be prepared, served, put away, and by the end of the night, the basement returns to its sleepy state.

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What was learned here will leave here: Reflections on My Site Development Fellowship

By Rachel Bukowitz
Repair the World Atlanta Site Development Fellow 2018-19, Pittsburgh Fellow 2017-18

After spending August 2017 through July 2018 as a Food Justice Fellow with Repair the World (Repair) in Pittsburgh, where I served on a team with five other Fellows and consistently volunteered with three nonprofit service partners, I packed up my car and drove down to Atlanta to embark on my second year with Repair, this time as a Site Development Fellow. Over the last 12 months, I was the only Fellow in Atlanta, and had a different mandate with regularly scheduled volunteering. My year was devoted to working with Lily Brent, Director of Atlanta Repair, to launch Repair’s eighth “community”– a local site for Repair’s mission to make volunteer service a defining part of a American Jewish life. 

As I reflect on when I first moved to Atlanta to start this new endeavor, I recognize that my site development experience with Repair far surpassed my initial expectations. From cooking alongside local chefs at shelters in Atlanta to serving meals for people experiencing homelessness, to meeting with donors and securing funding from grocery stores for meal preparation, from going into a prison to sign up incarcerated men for birth certificates, to talking to my state senator at the Capitol about ending cash bail, the spectrum of my experiences fundamentally transformed me. This year provided me with the opportunity to hear stories and learn from people directly impacted by inequities across education systems, housing affordability, food access and criminal justice. Furthermore, it made me think critically about how to use my privilege to support excellent social justice work and be an advocate for change. From all of the diverse roles and responsibilities I had this past year, I have come away with three key learnings that I outlined below:

  1. Say “yes” to new opportunities. Committing to being the Site Development Fellow for Atlanta was a big “yes” moment for me in and of itself. I moved to a new state, to a city I had never been to before and knew no one in, and started a new job with a new boss whom I had never met in person. But accepting the role was just the beginning of the “yes-ing”. Once in Atlanta, one of my main goals was to build Repair’s brand and “get our name out there” by taking advantage of every opportunity to tell people what Repair is, what we do, and how they could get involved in our work. I criss-crossed the city attending 80 community-based events, volunteering with 32 nonprofits, tabling at events, co-sponsoring film screenings, speaking on panels, running workshops, hosting volunteer days, you name it! During this 2018-9 program year, Lily and I ran 42 programs! I dove into my new city attending public events that sounded interesting to me and volunteering for organizations working on causes I care about – which guaranteed that I would be far too busy to be bored or lonely, feelings that can come easy moving somewhere new. Each and every volunteer program and community event that I went to pushed me to embrace new experiences and led to me meet fascinating people, which leads into my next learning…
  2. You can learn something from everyone. Although we spent a lot of time and effort facilitating large-scale events, building our network also meant sticking true to Repair’s core model of meeting people one-on-one in the community. One standout meeting for me was with someone who was at that time a stranger, but is now my good friend, Gabe. As a newbie in Atlanta, Gabe provided me with incredible insight into Atlanta’s Jewish community and the city at large. He introduced me to the city’s food forest, an incredible urban agriculture space that I have since repeatedly volunteered at and brought over 40 Repair volunteers to on various occasions. Gabe also introduced me to a network of other values-driven young adults in the city that I am now lucky enough to have as friends. For all that Gabe shared with me, I too shared with him about Repair’s great work across the country and what we were up to Atlanta. A month after Gabe and I met, Lily and I co-hosted our first Repair event with Historic Westside Gardens. Gabe came to the event (and brought friends!) to volunteer. In the months that followed, Gabe continued to stay involved by hosting one of our MLK Shabbat Suppers and volunteering at our bi-weekly gardening group. Excitingly, in the coming year Gabe will be continuing his journey with Repair as a Fellow in Miami! Although not everyone I met with will end up becoming Repair Fellows, I can say that everyone I met with learned about Repair, and I in turn learned more than I could possibly list here from each and every person I met. I want to thank all of the community activists, local leaders and dedicated volunteers that I got to know this year– meeting this community was without a doubt the best part of my year.
  3. Express gratitude. Being a Site Development Fellow was a lot of hard work, and although there were days when my to-do list felt out of control, my efforts were always acknowledged and appreciated. In fact, I received an abundance of thank you’s (in person, over email, by text, and even hand written notes), and in return, I want to send my sincerest thanks to all of my colleagues at Repair the World. I feel incredibly lucky to have worked with such a supportive group of people that celebrate each other’s accomplishments and promote skill-building, divergent thinking, professional development, and empathetic and equitable approaches to work. I can’t thank you all enough for everything I have learned; for teaching me how to launch a social media brand and training me on inclusive marketing, thank you. For showing me how to manage a database and run reports to track metrics towards our goals, thank you. For taking me to the edge of my productive discomfort by creating space for learning about racial justice, pluralism, and intersectionality, thank you. For providing a platform for me to express my own Jewish identity through service and solidarity, thank you. And for inspiring me each day as awesome mentors and femtors (looking at you, Lily and Kate!), thank you, thank you, thank you. All that I have learned here I will take with me to graduate school and beyond, as I do my part in repairing the world. 

 

The Network and Repair the World Camillus House Serving

This article originally appeared on JewishMiami.org on July 8, 2019. 

Join Greater Miami Jewish Federation and Repair the World Miami for service at Camillus House.

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Community Conversation: Inclusivity in Activism

This article originally appeared on Triblive.com on July 8, 2019. 

How do different groups work together to effect change, while being sensitive of each other’s needs? Playback Theatre will lead this workshop. Playback Theatre conducts improvisational storytelling, based on feelings and stories shared by audience members.

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Meet the teenage activist trying to build a climate-change movement in Pittsburgh

This article originally appeared in the Pittsburgh City Paper on June 26, 2019.

By Emily Wolfe

Leandra Mira is a little worried the people who pass her think she’s a doomsday prophet.

It’s the “11 YEARS” poster that might cause confusion, propped up next to Mira’s regular perch in Downtown Pittsburgh, right on the City-County Building steps. Those 11 years, some climate researchers say, are all that’s left to prevent irreversible damage from climate change.

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