Archive for : Press

Millie’s Ice Cream to roll out soft-serve with a new truck

This post originally appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette on November 8, 2017.

By Melissa McCart

Repair the World with pies

This Thanksgiving, Laura Bratkowski — who trained at the French Culinary Institute and previously worked for Momofuku Milk Bar in New York — is baking pies for Repair the World Pittsburgh, a nonprofit outreach, in tandem with bakers providing gluten- and dairy-free pies from Gluuteny in Squirrel Hill. The goal is to sell 300 pumpkin, pecan and apple pies in traditional or modified versions by Nov. 17. Pies range from around $10 to $12 and can be ordered here, with pickup on Nov. 22.

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Justice Action Bulletin: Pray with Dreamers; food justice; sanctuary in Missouri

This post originally appeared on The National Catholic Reporter on November 7, 2017

By Maria Benevento

New York — Repair the World announced Nov. 1 that they are launching an “Act Now against Hunger” campaign to “help tackle food justice through Jewish values” during millennial-hosted Thanksgiving dinners this year.

The campaign provides resources and discussion guides focusing on the root causes and impact of food insecurity, the effects of food waste, and strategies for fostering “generous and open conversation at your table” in a “tense or divisive space.” The materials include questions, rituals, readings and activities intended to integrate education and reflection into a Thanksgiving dinner.

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This Thanksgiving, “Act Now Against Hunger” with Repair the World

This post originally appeared on e-Jewish Philanthropy on October 31, 2017.

A central theme of millennial-hosted Thanksgiving dinners across the country this year is the simple notion that everyone deserves equitable access to healthy, fresh, affordable and culturally appropriate food. Repair the World urges its thousands of online followers to “Act Now Against Hunger,” offering DIY resources and discussion guides – available at weRepair.org/thanksgiving – to support meaningful conversations around food justice and food insecurity, including the connection between acting on these issues and Jewish values.

“Time and again young adults are choosing to build connections between how they live their lives and how they tackle our biggest social challenges,” says David Eisner, CEO of Repair the World. “They see only upside in bringing complex, uncomfortable and difficult conversations into their seasonal celebrations. For many of us, Thanksgiving with our family and friends is about discussing the meaning of gratitude and abundance. Act Now Against Hunger offers us the opportunity to make the scourge of food insecurity a big part of that discussion.”

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A Call for Young Jews To Do National Service

This post originally appeared in The Jewish Week on October 18, 2017

By E. Robert Goodkind

The concept of “dreams” is a recurring one in Jewish history — whether ancient or modern. Jacob had a dream about angels climbing a ladder to heaven. Herzl left us with the indelible message: “If you will it, it is no dream.”

I want to focus on a dream as well; two dreams actually, which are especially intertwined at this moment. One dream is for our country and one is for the Jewish service movement. The state of affairs in our nation — from social injustice, to divisive rhetoric, to fear of the “other” — presents an outstanding opportunity for the service movement and the Jewish one specifically, to mobilize people who want to create change.

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In these High Holidays, Act Now with Repair the World to Observe “A Different Kind of Service”

 

From the High Holidays through Next Passover, “Act Now” will Mobilize Young Jews to Address Urgent Needs around Education, Food and More

New York, NY — Repair the World, the largest Jewish service organization, today invited young adults to Act Now for a Different Kind of Service with the 2017 Jewish High Holidays chapter of its service and education campaign. Repair the World also announced that the year-long campaign, “Act Now,” will mobilize people to address immediate issues and engage in critical conversations at many other meaningful times throughout the Jewish year, including the upcoming holidays of Thanksgiving, MLK Day, and Purim, culminating with Passover in 2018.

“Jewish young adults today clamor more than ever for meaningful opportunities to meet urgent needs in their communities, especially at special times in the calendar when they feel called to act on their values,” said David Eisner, CEO of Repair the World. “Act Now will support these activists through providing opportunities to engage in meaningful service and community discussions, expressing our core Jewish values of striving for justice and the intrinsic value and dignity of every human life.”

Each element of Act Now will drive people to take action through service/volunteering, engaging in dialogue, skill building, and organizing their greater networks to get involved. Utilizing its highly collaborative model, Repair the World will work in partnership with local organizations around the country to help address pressing needs specific to each community, expanding the capacity of organizations and bringing a Jewish lens to the volunteering experience. Visit http://werepair.org/high-holidays/ to find or organize local service opportunities, as well as to pick up resources delving into the root causes of injustice, the guiding Jewish values, and discussion guides for tackling these difficult issues.

Repair the World also is releasing new materials, including:

Act Now (werepair.org/high-holidays) features a range of other guides and resources designed to help people take action, to facilitate challenging conversations, and to organize and participate in service opportunities around the country. Following the High Holidays, Act Now will continue to explore social justice through Thanksgiving, MLK Day, Purim, and Passover.

“Against an appalling drumbeat of tragedy and outrage, like we witnessed so recently in Charlottesville, young adults rightfully want to address the critical issues that threaten our communities,” adds Eisner. “For the next eight months, Act Now will offer a clarion call they can use to bring their friends, families and communities into making a difference through education, dialogue, and service.”

Holidays addressed for the first time in service campaigns by Repair the World this year are Thanksgiving—an opportunity to infuse a Jewish touchpoint into a secular holiday—and Purim, a holiday around which young adults have expressed increasing interest in engaging.

Act Now builds on Repair the World’s campaign last year urging participants to Act Now for Racial Justice, which engaged more than 14,000 participants in service experiences and/or peer-to-peer dinners and facilitated discussion.

Mansbach Bringing Change to Community

This post originally appeared on The Atlanta Jewish Times on March 2, 2017

By Michael Jacobs

Jodi Lox Mansbach’s priority in her new job as the Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta’s chief impact officer isn’t to develop measures of the effectiveness of Federation’s programs, but to figure out what the Jewish community needs.

From there, she can help figure out how Federation and its partner agencies can meet those needs to have the greatest impact.

“It’s really putting the community first,” said Mansbach, who started Feb. 22 at Federation in a new role that enables her to provide leadership and strategic vision for the organization.

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Repair the World Miami to launch this summer

This post originally appeared in The Florida Jewish Journal on February 6, 2017

By Sergio Carmona

The national organization Repair the World recently formed a partnership with the Greater Miami Jewish Federation to launch Repair the World Miami in summer 2017.

Repair the World is an organization devoted exclusively to engaging Jewish young adults in service. Repair the World Miami will join its sister Repair the World Communities programs in Baltimore, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and New York City in bringing a combination of peer-to-peer engagement, educational programs and community-based service opportunities to thousands of young Jewish adults and their friends.

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In Tense Political Climate, Young Jews Turn To Volunteering

This post originally appeared in The Jerusalem Post on February 3, 2017

By Danielle Ziri

As protests against President Donald Trump’s travel ban take place across the United States, some young American Jews have decided to volunteer to help marginalized communities.

One of the organizations that allows them to do so is Repair the World.

Founded in 2009 with the goal to “make meaningful service a defining element of American Jewish life,” the NGO aims to engage Jewish young adults with the communities around them.

The group operates across the United States, with a focus on programing in six cities: Baltimore, Chicago, Detroit, New York, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. In each city, Repair the World partners with local NGOs and allows members to volunteer in their communities.

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From Dialogue Comes Understanding: MLK Shabbat

This post originally appeared on The Schusterman Blog on January 31, 2017

By Jason Crain

This story comes to us from TableMakers, a Schusterman initiative that helps REALITY alumni to create and host dynamic Shabbat experiences for their peers. The experience described below was organized by Jason Crain, a Technical Product Manager and Entrepreneur in Residence at Amazon.com in Atlanta, GA. He graduated from Morehouse College, and hails from Kansas City, Mo. Here, Jason shares his thoughts from our MLK Day Shabbat dinner hosted in partnership with Repair the World. The dinner was part of Repair’s Turn the Tables dinner series and an extension of their #ActNowForRacialJustice campaign.

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What We Stand For at Repair the World

This post originally appeared in The Forward on January 19, 2017

By Liz Fisher, COO Repair the World

I haven’t (yet) seen Hamilton. Like many, I’ve heard the soundtrack and recently was reminded of a lyric from the show: “If you stand for nothing, Burr, what will you fall for?” “If you don’t stand for something, you’ll fall for anything.” Turns out, that quote likely didn’t originate with Alexander Hamilton. Whomever said it first, it echoes in my head as we move towards inauguration day and a new administration.

At Repair the World, we recognize that dissent and debate leshem shamayim (for the sake of heaven) are inherently Jewish and American values. We honor the rights of individuals and organizations to disagree, to express their opinions and perspectives in non-violent ways, and to engage in action to improve our communities and nation.

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