array(1) { [0]=> int(22) }

Archive for : Uncategorized

Meet Mike de la Rocha #AmplifyVoices

Our first #AmplifyVoices interview is here!

Meet Mike de la Rocha.

Mike de la Rocha is a renowned musician, writer and speaker in the fields of criminal justice, spirituality and self-development. With more than 15 years experience advancing public policy and empowering community stakeholders,Mike has facilitated strategic coalition-building efforts, drafted groundbreaking legislation and implemented innovative youth development programs nationally and internationally. Mike is a featured artist for Rock the Vote and has presented lectures and performed at various high profile events including Clinton Global Initiative University, TEDx, Chicago Ideas Week, and other events in Mexico, France, Germany, Ireland, South Africa, the United Kingdom and Canada.

Through this #AmplifyVoices interview by David Katznelson, learn more about Mike and the power of using music for social change.

Questions by David Katznelson
Responses by Mike de la Rocha

DK: What is it about music that, in your mind, is a primal force for cultural/social/political evolution? What is an example of one of the greatest pieces of music that has triggered change?

MDLR: Growing up music was my vehicle to learn about love, life and the world around me. It was bands and musicians like U2, Public Enemy and John Lennon who helped me better understand who I was through sharing stories of resiliency, struggle and courage. It was their lyrics and determination to create a different world that inspired me to become an artist committed to using my music for social awareness and social good. As a child growing up in Ventura, CA punk bands like Fugazi and Minor Threat made me feel as if I wasn’t alone and that I was a part of a community bigger than myself. It was the music of Lauryn Hill and Jeff Buckley who made me feel comfortable sharing my own stories of love and loss. And it was in those moments of listening to their vulnerability that I really experienced the transcendent and healing power of music and art.

For me, one of the biggest examples of an artist using his or her platform to bring about social change can be found in the music and life of both Nina Simone and Bob Marley who literally brought millions of people, neighborhoods and countries together through their lyrics, life and music. They personified for me, on a very human and basic level, the way that I could utilize my music to educate people about the historical struggles of people of color while at the same time really using love as the driving force behind my music and my message.

DK: How do you balance creating art for art’s sake and creating art as a change agent, with that idea that art needs to affect people in a more visceral way before the meaning can be unlocked?

MDLR: Music and song are central to social movements for change and transformation. Historically, artists have always helped me — and I would argue helped the broader public — think differently about identity, about culture and about our individual and collective ability to change the world.
I personally believe that some of the most impactful artists have simply been courageous enough to share their own stories and in turn have been able to speak to the lived experiences of so many of us. Whether that be a story about growing up feeling isolated or a story about the realities of life in a war-torn country, music has always been a universal language to help us see ourselves and our shared connection to each other. That’s why to me, music and song are central to our ability to recognize, embrace and transcend our differences. In the realm of song we are brought together by common experiences and reminded of the words of Subcomandante Marcos, one of the many leaders of the Zapatista Movement, who said that “We are the same because we are in fact different.”

DK: How has the internet, and other new modes of music consumption changed/enhanced the work you do? What would your advice be to up-and-comers on how to maximize effectiveness with the new platforms out there (e.g. Twitter, Facebook, etc.)?

MDLR: Today’s technology has allowed anybody to have direct access with people worldwide. Before, you needed big marketing budgets and a huge label, but today you can literally utilize Facebook or Twitter to get your music out there. I think that this direct access has benefited independent artists and that it’s now incumbent upon us to create great art and to hustle in getting our music out.
Stories are central to humanity and technology has made art even more accessible than ever before. Therefore, I’m hopeful in the future of music and the ability for artists to have a broader platform to share their message and music with the world. I would simply encourage others to keep speaking their truth, to be authentically themselves and to keep pushing to get your music out there.

DK: Can you let us in on a big goal that you have with your work? A goal you are working on, a goal that you have not yet achieved?

MDLR: In terms of goals, I want to continue using my art as a vehicle to have people see different perspectives and to learn about various issues that may or may not impact them directly.
I’m currently working nonstop on building Revolve Impact, a social impact firm that I founded last year, to become one of the leading companies working to utilize art and culture as a way to end mass incarceration and create safer and healthier communities worldwide.

DK: What was your favorite record of 2015? Does it tie into your work?

MDLR: My favorite album of 2015 was Kendrick Lamar’s “To Pimp a Butterfly.” But I would be remiss not to mention that 2015 was also the most difficult and memorable year of my life with the loss of my father and the starting my own company. It was a year of huge highs with the launch of John Legend’s  #FREEAMERICA campaign to a year of extreme lows where I was forced to re-examine everything. And again, like in so many moments of my life before, it was music that helped me get through it all. It was the music of James Bay’s “Let It Go” to Jack Johnson’s “Adrift,” to Death Cab for Cutie’s “Transatlanticism” to listening to the big banda music of Banda El Recodo that helped me grow and heal in 2015.

 

In the #AmplifyVoices campaign, we are pairing leaders in the Jewish community in conversation with activists for racial and social justice to further discussions on equality and social good, and to invite our audience to take action through volunteerism.

Meet David Katznelson #AmplifyVoices

David Katznelson

Meet David Katznelson.

David Katznelson is a Grammy-nominated music producer and a director at the Jewish Community Federation. He spent a decade at Warner Brothers and another operating Birdman Records, focusing a big part on the San Francisco underground music scene and reissue projects. He co-founded the San Francisco Appreciation Society as well as the Idelsohn Society.

We connected David with the amazing Mike De La Rocha (@mrmikedelarocha), in a conversation about social change and the power of music.

Learn more about David on his Twitter @oakiedog, and look out for the powerful #AmplifyVoices interview between David and Mike tomorrow!

In the #AmplifyVoices campaign, we are pairing leaders in the Jewish community in conversation with activists for racial and social justice to further discussions on equality and social good, and to invite our audience to take action through volunteerism. Learn more >>

#AmplifyVoices

This January, Repair the World is asking you to join us in our #AmplifyVoices campaign to Act for Racial Justice.

In this campaign, we are pairing leaders in the Jewish community in conversation with activists for racial justice to further the discussion on racial equality and invite our audience to take action through volunteerism.

Our interviewers have each come up with 5 questions to ask our interviewees, to inspire service and to become active participants in creating solutions for issues we face today.

We hope to #AmplifyVoices loud enough to incite action, and open hearts and minds.

Join the conversation at:

facebook.com/repairtheworld

instagram.com/repairtheworld

We’re hoping to stir a healthy conversation around social justice and your voice is important.

The first #AmplifyVoices interviews are here! Click through the list below to learn more about these outstanding leaders and activists.

David Katznelson & Mike de la Rocha

Meet Rabbi Jill Jacobs

Meet Carmen Perez

Jill Jacobs & Carmen Perez: The #AmplifyVoices Interview

How Repair the World Plans to Mobilize 400 Volunteers This MLK Day of Service

This post originally appeared on Generocity on January 7, 2016

By Julie Zeglen

Get your gardening gloves ready, your mural-painting brushes clean.  This year’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is coming up on Monday, Jan. 18, and with it comes the 21st annual Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service. It’s a big day for many nonprofits and service-oriented organizations in the city that want to kickstart support for their work. The question is, though, how they should best attract volunteers.

Read More

December 2015 Social Good Roundup!

In addition to our monthly Newsletter, we are also bringing you a monthly round-up of our favorite programs from our partners and from across the web. The opportunities below are separated by long term (6+ months), short term (6 months or less) and ongoing service, social good, and travel opportunities.

Be sure to check back monthly for updates and new finds!

Commit…To Service!     (Long-Term Programs)

You Want To Go To There.      (Short-Term and Travel Opportunities)

Be Social. Do Good.    (Social Good Jobs, Events and Campaigns)

Repair the World, In Detroit, Philly, Pittsburgh and NYC!

Don’t forget to check out upcoming opportunities in our Repair the World Communities:

 

This Week in Links: 11.30.15

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

This is the Story of One Block in Bed-Stuy, Brooklyn

My white neighbor thought I was breaking into my own apartment. Nineteen cops showed up.
Read more

November 2015 Social Good Roundup!

In addition to our monthly Newsletter, we are also bringing you a monthly round-up of our favorite programs from our partners and from across the web. The opportunities below are separated by long term (6+ months), short term (6 months or less) and ongoing service, social good, and travel opportunities.

Be sure to check back monthly for updates and new finds!

Commit…To Service!     (Long-Term Programs)

You Want To Go To There.      (Short-Term and Travel Opportunities)

Be Social. Do Good.    (Social Good Jobs, Events and Campaigns)

Repair the World, In Detroit, Philly, Pittsburgh and NYC!

Don’t forget to check out upcoming opportunities in our Repair the World Communities:

 

 

This Week in Links: 11.9.15

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

The Closest Look Yet at Gentrification and Displacement

The Rigging of the American Market

The 1 Percent’s Earnings Could Be Stagnating — At $671,000

America’s High-Earning Poor: There can be a big difference between income and assets.
Read more

Apply for a Repair the World Alternative Break Micro Grant by Nov 2!

We believe that Alternative Break programs offer an unparalleled opportunity for immersive service that builds community and leadership while making a difference. So we have found a way to help dedicated people and groups make them happen!

Repair the World is offering micro-grants to support new and long-standing Alternative Break experiences for North American young adults. Micro-grant award amounts will range from $1,000-$5,000 and will vary depending on the number of program participants, program location, emphasis on post-program engagement and other factors.

Think your Alternative Break program fits the bill? Apply by November 2 and you might just have the best break ever!*

Find out more about the many ways Repair the World fosters high quality Alternative Break programs (and how you can get involved!) here.

*Please note that these micro grants are applicable to non-Hillel related programs. Hillel campuses can apply for separate funding, and should apply directly through Hillel International.