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This Week in Links: 9.25.15

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

After years of cuts, school districts face teacher shortages

Panel Studying Racial Divide in Missouri Presents a Blunt Picture of Inequity

Are College Lectures Unfair?

One Way Forward for Ferguson Is Clear—And Still Impossible

Why Critics of the ‘Microaggressions’ Framework Are Skeptical

Readers Lament the Rise of ‘Victimhood Culture’

Microaggressions Matter
Read more

This Week in Links: 9.16.15

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

Neighbors But Not Classmates

The intellectual history of the minimum wage and overtime
The Architecture of Segregation

Support for Redistribution in an Age of Rising Inequality: New Stylized Facts and Some Tentative Explanations

Urban Trees Enhance Children’s Brains, Too
Read more

September 2015

In addition to our monthly Newsletter, we are also bringing you a monthly round-up of our favorite programs from our partners and from across the web. The opportunities below are separated by long term (6+ months), short term (6 months or less) and ongoing service, social good, and travel opportunities.

Be sure to check back monthly for updates and new finds!

Commit…To Service!     (Long-Term Programs)

You Want To Go To There.      (Short-Term and Travel Opportunities)

Be Social. Do Good.    (Social Good Jobs, Events and Campaigns)

Food Justice interview: Oran Hesterman of Fair Food Network

This fall, Repair the World is building a movement to Inspire Service, focusing on the critical issue of food justice in conjunction with Hunger Action Month.

Meanwhile, we’re spotlighting the work of awesome food justice-minded companies and organizations around the world. This week: Fair Food Network: an organization dedicated to building a more just and sustainable food system. We spoke with President and CEO, Oran Hesterman, not making sacrifices or compromises when it comes to helping food be sustainable and just for all.

Why is the work you do around food so important right now?
There are times when groups working on food issues seem to be camped out at one of two poles. On the one side are the epicureans or “foodies” who make the point that we need to pay the real cost for good food in order to support farmers. On the other side are the anti-hunger activists whose top priority is preserving calories for those most vulnerable. Make no mistake, the thinking behind both is commendable and necessary, but it should never be a question of whether we support hungry families or local farmers. We can and need to do both.

At Fair Food Network, we develop multi-win solutions that work across the food system to ensure that farmers earn a fair price for their products AND that families—especially those most underserved—have access to the most nutritious and delicious food possible.

Can you share a brief story that demonstrates Fair Food Network’s impact on food justice?
Our signature effort at Fair Food Network is a healthy food incentive program called Double Up Food Bucks. Double Up provides low-income Americans who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamp) benefits with a one-to-one match to purchase healthy, locally grown fruits and vegetables.

Let’s say you’re a Michigan family living in Detroit. For every dollar of SNAP benefits you spend at your local farmers market, you get an equal amount to purchase Michigan grown fruits and vegetables. This means you can bring home $40 of healthy food for just $20.

Since 2009, we’ve grown Double Up from a small pilot in five farmers markets in Detroit to a statewide success story in more than 150 sites, now also including at grocery stores in one of the first such pilots in the country. Today nearly 90% of Michigan shoppers live in a county where the program operates. Our strong track record in Michigan helped inspire the new $100 million Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive (FINI) grants program in the 2014 Farm Bill. Because of matching fund requirements, with FINI there will be at least $200 million flowing to support programs such as Double Up Food Bucks across the county.

This March, Fair Food Network was honored to receive $5.1 million in FINI funding to expand Double Up Food Bucks in our home state of Michigan. The grant, the second largest in the first round of funding, will be matched with private funds for a total of nearly $10.4 million, which will allow us to grow the program at farmers markets, help markets adopt mobile technology and be open year-round, and increase program use in up to 50 grocery stores of all sizes.

In what ways do volunteers get involved with your work?
The success of Double Up Food Bucks is grounded in partnerships. We are currently growing our volunteer network and looking for help in bringing the program to life, particularly as it expands to more grocery stores. Volunteers are needed to greet shoppers and share how Double Up works at participating stores, give store tours or healthy food cooking demonstrations, connect with community partners, or help coordinate other volunteers.

What are the biggest challenges to your work?
There are many successful sustainable food models out there that didn’t exist 10 or 20 years ago. One of the biggest challenges we – along with many other groups – face right now is how to shepherd such programs from models into the mainstream. As we have seen with healthy food incentives, policy can be a powerful vehicle to help spread and scale innovations. It is up to us to continue proving the concept and keeping our elected officials engaged in and informed of our work so they can be champions of this work.

And on the flip side, what have you found most inspiring?
Double Up and similar incentive programs can be game-changers. SNAP accounts for the largest government expenditure in our food and agriculture system. Programs like Double Up leverage those federal dollars to meet families’ immediate food needs with fresh, healthy food. But it doesn’t stop there: if they maintain a connection to local agriculture, they can also support area farmers and keep money in the local economy, which in turn spurs economic activity and opportunity.

In this way, food stamps are not only a way to assist low-income families in the here and now, they are also a powerful tool for long-term healthcare savings and an engine for economic development and revitalization. Conventional wisdom says you need a carrot and a stick to change behavior. What we have shown with Double Up Food Bucks is that you just need a better tasting and more affordable carrot.

Learn more about Fair Food Network at their website. And hear what Carole Caplan, Director of Program Enhancement at Fair Food Network had to say about her passion for food justice and Judaism on Repair’s recent “What on Earth is Food Justice?” Webinar.

August 2015 Social Good Roundup!

In addition to our monthly Newsletter, we are also bringing you a monthly round-up of our favorite programs from our partners and from across the web. The opportunities below are separated by long term (6+ months), short term (6 months or less) and ongoing service, social good, and travel opportunities.

Be sure to check back monthly for updates and new finds!

Commit…To Service!     (Long-Term Programs)

You Want To Go To There.      (Short-Term and Travel Opportunities)

Be Social. Do Good.    (Social Good Jobs, Events and Campaigns)

This Week in Links: 7.20.15

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

Americans Support Working Mothers More Than Ever, but Policies Don’t

False Sense of Security

Rising Economic Insecurity Tied to Decades-Long Trend in Employment Practices

A Bias More than Skin Deep

Connecting Young People with Jobs

How a Seattle Plan to End Single-Family Zoning Could Change Affordable Housing

The Best Way to End Homelessness

The Destruction of a Black Suburb

9 Annoying Things You Do at Farmers’ Markets, According to Farmers

Incarceration, Education, Emancipation

How Aggressive Policing Affects Police Officers Themselves

Only Black Deaths Matter

Race in a Ph.D. Program

12 reasons to worry about our criminal justice system, from a prominent conservative federal judge

Best Way to Help Homeless Families? Give Them Homes

Resilience Is Futile: How Well-Meaning Nonprofits Perpetuate Poverty

Slowing Gentrification By Building Up

Activist who took down Confederate flag drew on her faith and on new civil rights awakening

These Scholars Have Been Pointing Out Atticus Finch’s Racism for Years

Bringing Broadband to Kids Who Really Need It

New report highlights cases of police brutality inside middle and high schools

How Fair Housing Will Turn Liberal Cities Conservative

Finding Humanity in Gone With the Wind

One Major Missing Link to Solving Youth Unemployment: Corporations

The Semantics of Test Scores

How Libraries Can Compete With Google and Amazon

Dividing Lines: School District Borders in the United States

July 2015 Social Good Roundup!

In addition to our monthly Newsletter, we are also bringing you a monthly round-up of our favorite programs from our partners and from across the web. The opportunities below are separated by long term (6+ months), short term (6 months or less) and ongoing service, social good, and travel opportunities.

Be sure to check back monthly for updates and new finds!

Commit…To Service!     (Long-Term Programs)

You Want To Go To There.      (Short-Term and Travel Opportunities)

Be Social. Do Good.    (Social Good Jobs, Events and Campaigns)

This Week in Links: July 6, 2015

Welcome to This Week In Links. This series is a place for us to share articles that our fellows and staff are reading to deepen their understanding of the context of their work. By linking to these stories, we are not necessarily endorsing the positions, but sharing interesting material for discussion and reflection. We invite you to share, comment, and discuss these stories, and also to share your top links from the past week!

Corporatized: The Movie

‘It’s Like Having A Crazy Family Member’: On Southern Black Folks And The Rebel Flag

Around the world, do symbols like the Confederate flag stand for heritage or hate?

A novel explanation the black-white wage gap: Productivity spillovers require social interactions between workers

Inequality: The Right’s Problem

Read more

REPAIR THE WORLD ANNOUNCES NEW CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

NEW YORK, June 30 – Repair the World announced today that Elizabeth “Liz” Fisher, former Managing Director of Birthright NEXT, will become the Jewish service organization’s Chief Operating Officer on August 17th.
The new COO position will oversee all non-program departments at Repair the World including Development, Finance and Operations, and Marketing and Communications.
“With Liz as COO, Repair is poised for sustainable growth and scale,” said David Eisner, President and CEO of Repair the World. “Liz is an entrepreneurial, energetic and accomplished non-profit leader who has helped organizations achieve growth and success.  Her deep fundraising expertise, her history of managing multiple divisions simultaneously, and her knack for engaging Jewish young adults, Repair’s core audience, all speak to why we’re thrilled to recruit her as a leader on the Repair the World team.”

“I’m excited by the team, the programs and the mission of Repair the World,” said Liz Fisher. “I’ve seen the need in our communities for Repair the World’s cutting edge integration of meaningful service with young Jewish adult engagement; this is the right place for the Jewish community to be focused and Repair the World is poised for success.”
During her three years at NEXT, Liz spoke across the country about young adult engagement and managing millennial employees.  Prior to that, she served as Director of Development and Institutional advancement at the Jewish Education Project and in multiple professional capacities at UJA-Federation of NY. Liz received her Masters in Social Work from Washington University, St. Louis, concentrating in Community Development and Management.  Liz is currently a Schusterman Fellow in the inaugural class of that leadership development program.
The program department will continue to be overseen by Mordy Walfish, VP for Programs. Ilana Aisen, Executive Vice President, who most recently oversaw Development and Communications, will depart Repair the World at the end of July in order to move with her family back to Toronto, where she grew up.  Ilana, who served with Repair the World for six years, has been appointed Director of the Centre for Jewish Identity at UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
“We at Repair are grateful for the outsized contributions Ilana has made in her six years growing our organization and our field, we wish her and her family well in their move, and we know she will be wildly successful in her next role,” said Eisner.

 

About Repair the World

Repair the World works to inspire American Jews and their communities to give their time and effort to serve those in need. We engage Jewish young adults through national campaigns and through efforts on the grassroots, community level. Both nationally and in select local areas, including Baltimore, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and Brooklyn NYC, Repair the World works to make service a defining part of Jewish life by mobilizing young adults to volunteer and to make change in communities. For more information, visit weRepair.org.
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Media Contact: Ryan Greiss, Puder PR

Office: 212.558.9400; Cell: 201.906.0497; [email protected]