Archive for : The Forward

Monday Link Roundup

Happy Monday! Hopefully you had a wonderful Rosh Hashanah celebration and a restful weekend. Stay in the High Holiday spirit with Repair the World’s Marathon of Good: 10 opportunities to serve between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. To get you geared up, here is your weekly round up of inspiring service stories from around the web.

Monday Link Roundup

Happy Monday! With autumn around the corner, these last summer weekends begin to feel more precious – so hopefully you had the opportunity to make the most of it. As always, to jump start your week, here’s a weekly round up of inspirational service links from around the web.


  • Pursue
    published a touching poem by Avital Aboody called “A Farewell Poem: Concluding a Year of Service.”
  • The Huffington Post published a piece by Sara Vogel about how one-on-one tutoring has the potential to make a big difference in Mexico’s schools.
  • The Forward’s website features a video that gives and in-depth look at Crown Heights, Brooklyn – 20 years after the riots that threatened to split the neighborhood apart.
  • JSpot published an evaluation of the new movie The Help and its implications for today’s domestic workers community.
  • GOOD shared some promising news: solar power is getting cheaper all the time, making it a more viable energy source.

Monday Link Roundup

Happy Monday! Hopefully the soggy weather, which left much of the East Coast water-logged over the last couple of days, didn’t cramp your weekend style. To inject a little sunshine into the beginning of the week, here’s your weekly dose of inspiration from around the web.

  • The New York Times published an article by the inimitable Samuel Freedman about a Jewish summer camp focused on young Jews of color.
  • The JTA posted the latest news about the tens of thousands of peaceful protesters crowding the streets – and not just in Tel Aviv.
  • Meanwhile, The Forward offered an op-ed by J.J. Goldberg which recounted Israeli novelist, David Grossman’s thoughts on the protests and his experiences from the front line.
  • GOOD offers a bit of fascinating (and comparatively hopeful) environmental news about how humans are helping animal populations around the world adapt to a changing global climate.
  • The San Francisco Chronicle to end on a bright note, shares how a seven year old kid decided to donate his piggybank money to a local environmental nonprofit.

Monday Link Roundup

Happy Monday! Here to get you geared up for the week ahead, is your regular dose of inspiration from around the web. Read on…

  • The Jewish Week featured an essay by rabbinical student, Daniel Millner, on his recent service trip to Alabama to help rebuild tornado-devastated communities.
  • JTA reported on Repair the World’s study on service, volunteering and Jewish values.
  • The Forward published a tribute by women’s rights activist, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, on the legacy of fellow activist and co-author of “The Women’s Hagaddah,” Esther Broner, who passed away last week.
  • The Huffington Post published an essay by Rabbi Lawrence Troster calling for forging a deeper, more sacred connection to the earth.
  • The Huffington Post also included an article about First Lady Michelle Obama’s recent inspirational trip to visit Peace Corps workers in Botswana.
  • The New York Times published an article about how charities are using texting and other modern technologies to raise awareness and appeal to younger supporters.

Young Jews Love To Volunteer, Though Not for Jewish Organizations

A just-released study on young Jews and volunteerism reveals that, although young Jews are committed to community service and volunteering, they tend not to associate that interest with their Jewish identities. This is the case despite the fact that commitment to volunteerism increases with a young Jew’s level of religious involvement. The study also found that most service work is locally based, and that Israel is not a focus for young Jews’ volunteer efforts.

The study, called “Volunteering + Values: A Repair the World Report on Jewish Young Adults” was commissioned by the service organization Repair the World and was conducted as a collaborative effort between the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University and Gerstein | Agne Strategic Communications. It used a sample of young Jewish adults, ages 18-35, from among the 300,000 diverse applicants to the Taglit-Birthright Israel program. Some survey respondents were alumni of the program, while others were not. Additional respondents were chosen through Knowledge Networks, which provides a representative sample of the U.S. population using probability-based sampling techniques.

So far, the major findings of the survey include the fact that a majority (between two-thirds and three-quarters) of young Jews — motivated by the desire to help others and get involved in causes important to them for personal reasons — are engaged in volunteer and civic work. Although a third of young Jews volunteer regularly at least once a month, less than a quarter of them have participated in an intensive, multi-week or multi-month service program.

Eighty percent of those volunteering do so on a local level. They are concerned about addressing issues like poverty, hunger and illiteracy in their own cities and neighborhoods. Only 1% are involved in volunteer work focused on Israel and/or the Middle East.

More young Jewish women than young Jewish men have done volunteer work in the past year, and it is the more religiously affiliated Jews who have the highest level of engagement in volunteering. Also, young Jews who see or recall their own parents volunteering have a higher tendency to get involved themselves. Twenty-five percent of the respondents said that they were recruited to volunteer by family members or friends.

In its summary of the study, eJewish Philanthropy highlighted the fact that only 23% of the respondents were aware of volunteer opportunities available through the Jewish channels. A majority of young Jews are not looking to volunteer in or through the Jewish community because they perceive it as being too narrow and parochial. With universal, rather than Jewish, values driving their desire to volunteer, they seek to serve others in the greater community — and they view their volunteer work as something separate from Jewish life.

Read more: http://blogs.forward.com/the-shmooze/139059/#ixzz1QD9xXE8P