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Archive for : The New York Times

Repair Inspiration: NY Times Rocks Women’s History Month

You know that thing where you wish something existed, and then you find out that it does? That’s how I felt upon discovering the New York Times’ treasure trove of stories, stats, and resources about women for Women’s History Month.

The page links to videos (like this one about the inimitable Malala Yousafzai), and historical articles dating back to 1915 (yep, 100 years ago!) featuring NY Times coverage of stories like women getting the right to vote (1919), Amelia Earhart’s historic flight (1928) and the naming of Sandra Day O’Connor as the first female Supreme Court Justice (1981). It also links to current articles, crossword puzzles, and lesson plans for teachers who want to use the material in their classrooms.

So basically, they harnessed the entirety of the New York Times’ archival and educational power and used it to lift up women’s stories and influence. Yeah. That’s pretty much just as cool as it sounds.

We are halfway through Women’s History Month, which gives you plenty of time to use and share this incredible resource. Let us know what you discover by tweeting us at @repairtheworld #womenshistorymonth.

Repair Inspiration: Auschwitz Survivor Meets German Hip-Hop Duo

File this under awesome: A recent New York Times article told the story about an 89-year old Holocaust survivor who is teaming up with a German hip-hop group called Microphone Mafia to spread music and a message. Read an excerpt below and find the whole article on the Times’ website.

NEW YORK TIMES
Amid the Rap Music, Echoes of an Orchestra Playing in a Dark Past
By: Sally McGrane
June 27, 2014

“BERLIN — AT various points during shows, the German rapper Kutlu Yurtseven gestures to a bandmate sitting demurely off to the side. That’s the cue for 89-year-old Esther Bejarano, a diminutive woman with a snow-white pixie cut, to jump in with a song. “When will the heavens open up, again, for me?” is one favorite, the refrain of a local carnival tune. “When will they open up?”

It is an unusual pairing. Ms. Bejarano is one of the last surviving members of the Auschwitz Girls’ Orchestra, the only all-female ensemble among the many Nazi-run prisoner musical groups in the camp system. Among other duties, the Girls’ Orchestra was responsible for playing the marches that imprisoned women had to keep step to as they went out to work in the morning and, even more cruelly, as they returned, half-dead, at the end of the day.

Five years ago, hoping to reach more young people with her story and her message of tolerance and anti-fascism, Ms. Bejarano teamed up with Microphone Mafia, a German hip-hop duo with Turkish and Italian roots. They have released their first album, and have been playing concerts throughout Germany and Europe ever since.

The music combines songs like the poignant Yiddish resistance song, “We’ll Live Forever,” composed in the Nazi-run Jewish ghetto in Vilna just before it was liquidated, with rap passages about current problems like racism that, in Ms. Bejarano’s view, show that the lessons of the Holocaust still need to be learned.”

Read more…

Letter to the Editor: “Class in America: Exploring the Divide”

To the Editor:

David Brooks is right that national service is a vital tool for building bridges between different “social tribes.” National service programs such as the Peace Corps and AmeriCorps also do far more: they deliver real benefits to communities while forging a stronger civil society.

And today, in a time of alarmingly high unemployment and underemployment rates among America’s young people, a strong emphasis on national service can help the next generation build necessary leadership and employment skills, regardless of which “social tribe” they come from.

Despite our current economic woes — in fact, because of them — a renewed commitment to expanding national service opportunities should be a major bipartisan goal and a key element of American policy.

JON ROSENBERG
New York, Jan. 31, 2012

The writer is chief executive of Repair the World, which promotes service opportunities for American Jews.